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Are there any practical differences between these approaches? (memory, GC, performance, etc?)

while...{
   Object o=new Object();
   ...
   o=new Object();
   ...
}

and

Object o;
while...{
   o=new Object();
   ...
   o=new Object();
   ...
}
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10  
There is one difference. Your first code doesn't compile, while the 2nd one compiles successfully. Please test your code before posting here. –  Rohit Jain Nov 9 '12 at 16:31
    
Even though there are in terms of GC and memory usage, those would be negligible. –  Nambari Nov 9 '12 at 16:31
    
Unless you've oversimplified your code you'll receive a compile error on the first one as you are redeclaring o within the same scope. –  TheCapn Nov 9 '12 at 16:32
    
only significant difference is the scope of the reference variable o –  Sam I am Nov 9 '12 at 16:39
    
However, the compiler optimizes it and tries to limit the scope. Decompiled code for second example would be something like , ` while () { Object o = new Object(); o = new Object(); }` –  Jimmy Nov 9 '12 at 16:41
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

From Effective Java 2nd Edition:

The most powerful technique for minimizing the scope of a local variable is to declare it where it is first used. If a variable is declared before it is used, it’s just clutter—one more thing to distract the reader who is trying to figure out what the program does. By the time the variable is used, the reader might not remember the variable’s type or initial value.

Declaring a local variable prematurely can cause its scope not only to extend too early, but also to end too late. The scope of a local variable extends from the point where it is declared to the end of the enclosing block. If a variable is declared outside of the block in which it is used, it remains visible after the program exits that block. If a variable is used accidentally before or after its region of intended use, the consequences can be disastrous.

In other words, the difference in performance (CPU, memory) are irrelevant in your case. What is far more important is the semantics and correctness of the program, which is better in your first code example.

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In your first example, o will go out of scope after your while loop finishes.

Now, If you don't actually use o outside of the while loop (even if you load the object it references into a different structure) this is fine, but you won't be able to access o outside of the loop

also, and this is just being nitpicky, but neither of those will compile, because you declare Object o twice.

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Edited... wrote these "on-the-fly" :-\ –  marcolopes Nov 9 '12 at 18:35
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I think you need to trade off between object reuse and the eligibility for garbage collection + readability.

The minimum scope always increase readability & minimize error-proneness.

Again if the creation of some object is too costly(like Thread, Database Connection), the reuse should be considered. They are not generally created inside loop and are cached in pool.

That's why connection pooling & Thread Pool are so popular.

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In case of Option 1, Object will be eligible for GC once while loops finishes, whereas in option 2 Object will last until method end.

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