Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a class Parent and a class Child. Child derives from Parent. I only instantiate the Child class, the parent gets never initialized directly, only by the child. I need at least Parent to be a singleton. If that does not work, Child being a singleton is okay too. I tried the following but that didn't change it to a singleton:

static MySingleton *sharedSingleton;

+ (void)initialize
{
    static BOOL initialized = NO;
    if(!initialized)
    {
        initialized = YES;
        sharedSingleton = [[MySingleton alloc] init];
    }
}

The Child class calls [super init] to instantiate the Parent. Can you help me here?

EDIT: I add some background information for my solution (architecture): I have a web service client which has a connection to a web service. I have a base class (Parent) which has information about the connection (authenticated, how to connect etc) and I have different child classes which derive from this base class. The need for different child classes is that one child is responsible for a set of web service logic and another child is responsible for another set of web service logic. The problem is, I want the connection information to be singleton (because they all use only ONE connection, not many).

share|improve this question
    
That initialized variable is superfluous, why not check for if (sharedSingleton == nil)? –  user529758 Nov 9 '12 at 17:12
    
Maybe you could briefly explain what you are trying to achieve, as having Parent be a singleton and a Child deriving from it not looks a bit messy to me. Maybe there is a better solution to the problem? –  Anton Nov 9 '12 at 17:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If I understand you correctly what you are asking doesn't make sense, you seem to be confusing relationship with inheritance. If you have:

@interface Parent : NSObject ...
@interface Child : Parent

Then every Child you create is a Parent as well, indivisibly part of itself, there is no way to split the Parent from the Child - you have a single object. Using inheritance does not give you multiple children with a single shared parent.

If you want many children to share a single parent then you need your Child class to have a Parent. For example:

@interface Parent : NSObject ...

@interface Child : NSObject

@property (readonly) Parent *myParent;

- (id) initAsChildOf:(Parent *)parent;

...

@end

used as:

Parent *theParent = [Parent new];
Child *firstChild = [[Child alloc] initAsChildOf:theParent];
Child *secondChild = [[Child alloc] initAsChildOf:theParent];

If you wish you can make Parent a singleton class (only one instance possible), or a shared instance class (one shared instance, other instances possible).

With inheritance, as opposed to a relationship, it is hard (but not impossible ;-)) to derive from a true singleton class and if you do so the derived class is itself a singleton.

You can derive from a shared instance class; and you could write the class (hard again) so that you can have one and only one instance which is not indivisibly part of a instance of a derived class.

Note: the other answers so far have all provided you with code to produce a shared instance class, a true singleton class is a little more involved (you can find the code in Apple's documentation) and often a shared instance class is sufficient.

HTH and I've haven't misunderstood your question completely!

share|improve this answer
    
thx, can you add explanation about the difference between a true singleton and a shared instance? I can't find anything useful in apple's documentation (sometimes the docs are too old). I added some background information to my question. What would you recommend to that? –  tester Nov 10 '12 at 11:21
    
A true singleton is a class which can have at most one instance; in Objective-C to create one typically involves overriding allocWithZone and/or init to ensure that any attempt to create an instance returns the same unique instance. A shared instance class is simply a class with a well-known instance which is easy to obtain, typically using a class method such as sharedInstance; other instances of the class may exist. Many Cocoa classes follow the later model, e.g. NSFileManager with its defaultManager. –  CRD Nov 10 '12 at 17:52
    
I acutally found out, that if I use the singleton code with the dispatch_once_t logic I can't use allocWithZone. Just for information. so how can I prevent someone using alloc on my singleton then? –  tester Nov 12 '12 at 20:33
    
If you look at this singleton code, which is based on Apple's you will see it uses an @synchronised construct; if you wished you could replace that code with a version which uses dispatch_once. –  CRD Nov 12 '12 at 21:47

A more thread safe option would be something like:

+(MySingleton *)singleton {
    static dispatch_once_t pred;
    static MySingleton *shared = nil;

    dispatch_once(&pred, ^{
        shared = [[MySingleton alloc] init];
    });
    return shared;
}
share|improve this answer

put this line static BOOL initialized = NO; below this line static MySingleton *sharedSingleton; like this

static MySingleton *sharedSingleton;
static BOOL initialized = NO;
+ (void)initialize
{
  if(!initialized)
  {
     initialized = YES;
     sharedSingleton = [[MySingleton alloc] init];
  }
}

hope that helps!

share|improve this answer

The usual pattern for this is:

static MySuperclass *singleton = nil;
+ (void)initialize {
    if (self == [MySuperclass class]) {
        singleton = [[MySubclassProbabl alloc] init];
    }
}
share|improve this answer

A bit different from the other answers, this is the modern way to create a singleton

static MySingleton * volatile sharedInstance = nil;

+(MySingleton*) sharedInstance {
    static dispatch_once_t onceToken;
    dispatch_once(&onceToken, ^{
        sharedInstance = [[MySingleton alloc] init];
    });

    return sharedInstance;
}

Also, by the wording of your questions and intended use of singletons (with parent/child relationship), I'd say that you have to rethink your architecture.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.