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I'm using Kubuntu 12.04, gcc 4.6.3. If I create a pthread, use fopen64 and then fgets - it segfaults. Same code replacing fopen64 with fopen - it succeeds. Without creating pthread - it succeeds. So why the failure? Here's the code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <pthread.h>
typedef struct threadArgs
{
    char* argsList;
    int argc;
} threadArgs;

void 
threadRun(void *pArg);

int
main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    int err = 0;
    threadArgs thrArgs;
    pthread_t thrd;  

    if (argc > 1)
    {
        printf("creating thread \n");
        err = pthread_create (&thrd, NULL, (void *) &threadRun, (void *) &thrArgs);
        printf("pthread_create returned: %d \n", err);
        pthread_join(thrd, NULL);
    }
    else
    {
        printf("no thread - just calling func \n");
        threadRun((void*)&thrArgs);
    }
    printf("Exiting main() \n");

    return err;
}

void 
threadRun(void *pArg)
{
    printf("IN the Thread \n");
    char* pStr;
    FILE *pFile = NULL;

    pFile = (FILE*)fopen64("test.txt","r");
    //pFile = (FILE*)fopen("test.txt","r");

    if (pFile==NULL)
    {
        printf("pFile is NULL \n");
    }
    else
    {
        printf("pFile is NOT null \n");
        char line[256];
        pStr = fgets(line, sizeof(line),pFile);
        if (pStr)
        {
            printf("line retrieved: %s \n", line);
        }
        else
        {
            printf("no line retrieved \n");
        }
    }   

    printf("End of pthread run func \n");
    return;
}
share|improve this question
    
Can you remove the (FILE*) cast of fope64 and try again? –  William Morris Nov 9 '12 at 17:26
    
Do you have a prototype for fopen64() included from somewhere? Or: Why do you cast fopen64()? –  alk Nov 9 '12 at 17:52
    
Remove all castings (as your code does not need them), then recompile with all warnings on and fix your code until you do not get any wanrings anymore. Then come back and tell us about the outcome ... :-) –  alk Nov 9 '12 at 17:55
    
Few checks, does file <executable> show that its a 64 bit executable? Does ldd <executable> show the libraries it depends on are 64 bit libraries (libc, libpthread etc)? What does gdb show? –  another.anon.coward Nov 9 '12 at 17:56
2  
Do not use fopen64(), as there is not prototype available for it in your build environment. Please see my answer. @SkippyVonDrake –  alk Nov 9 '12 at 18:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

pthread_create() expects void * (*)(void *) as thread function, but you are passing void (*)(void *).


Update:

You are missing a prototype for fopen64(), so the compiler assumes int which is not the same as FILE*.


Update 1:

To have this prototype available (and with this fix you initial problem) just add:

#define _LARGEFILE64_SOURCE

as first line in your source file.

Additional edit: To be exact: _LARGEFILE64_SOURCE needs to #defineed before #includeing stdio.h


Update 2:

Following the sources I used to make the suxxer work (main.c):

#define _LARGEFILE64_SOURCE

#include <stdio.h>
#include <pthread.h>

typedef struct threadArgs
{
    char* argsList;
    int argc;
} threadArgs;

void *
threadRun(void *pArg);

int
main(int argc, char* argv[]) /* line 16 */
{
    int err = 0;
    threadArgs thrArgs;
    pthread_t thrd;

    if (argc > 1)
    {
        printf("creating thread \n");
        err = pthread_create (&thrd, NULL, threadRun, &thrArgs);
        printf("pthread_create returned: %d \n", err);
        pthread_join(thrd, NULL);
    }
    else
    {
        printf("no thread - just calling func \n");
        threadRun((void*)&thrArgs);
    }
    printf("Exiting main() \n");

    return err;
}

void  *
threadRun(void *pArg)  /* line 40 */
{
    printf("IN the Thread \n");
    char* pStr;
    FILE *pFile = NULL;

    pFile = fopen64("test.txt","r");

    if (pFile==NULL)
    {
        printf("pFile is NULL \n");
    }
    else
    {
        printf("pFile is NOT null \n");
        char line[256];
        pStr = fgets(line, sizeof(line),pFile);
        if (pStr)
        {
            printf("line retrieved: %s \n", line);
        }
        else
        {
            printf("no line retrieved \n");
        }
    }

    printf("End of pthread run func \n");

    return 0;
}

build by:

$gcc -Wall -g -o main main.c -pedantic -Wextra -std=c99 -pthread 
main.c: In function ‘main’:
main.c:16: warning: unused parameter ‘argv’
main.c: In function ‘threadRun’:
main.c:40: warning: unused parameter ‘pArg’

(no other errors or warnings)

enviroment:

$ uname -a
Linux debian-stable 2.6.32-5-amd64 #1 SMP Sun Sep 23 10:07:46 UTC 2012 x86_64 GNU/Linux
$ gcc --version
gcc (Debian 4.4.5-8) 4.4.5
[...]
$ ldd main
        linux-vdso.so.1 =>  (0x00007fff466d6000)
        libpthread.so.0 => /lib/libpthread.so.0 (0x00007f15ccd20000)
        ibc.so.6 => /lib/libc.so.6 (0x00007f15cc9be000)
        /lib64/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2 (0x00007f15ccf4b000)

The output (using main.c's source without \ns as test.txt):

$ valgrind ./main 1
==31827== Memcheck, a memory error detector
==31827== Copyright (C) 2002-2010, and GNU GPL'd, by Julian Seward et al.
==31827== Using Valgrind-3.6.0.SVN-Debian and LibVEX; rerun with -h for copyright info
==31827== Command: ./main 1
==31827== 
creating thread 
pthread_create returned: 0 
IN the Thread 
pFile is NOT null 
line retrieved: #define _LARGEFILE64_SOURCE #include <stdio.h> #include <pthread.h> typedef struct threadArgs { char* argsList; int argc; } threadArgs; void * threadRun(void *pArg); int main(int argc, char* argv[]) { int err = 0; threadArgs thrArgs; pthread_t thrd; if (a 
End of pthread run func 
Exiting main() 
==31827== 
==31827== HEAP SUMMARY:
==31827==     in use at exit: 568 bytes in 1 blocks
==31827==   total heap usage: 2 allocs, 1 frees, 840 bytes allocated
==31827== 
==31827== LEAK SUMMARY:
==31827==    definitely lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==31827==    indirectly lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==31827==      possibly lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==31827==    still reachable: 568 bytes in 1 blocks
==31827==         suppressed: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==31827== Rerun with --leak-check=full to see details of leaked memory
==31827== 
==31827== For counts of detected and suppressed errors, rerun with: -v
==31827== ERROR SUMMARY: 0 errors from 0 contexts (suppressed: 4 from 4)
share|improve this answer
    
pthread_create() never failed in this example - at least for me. But I changed void to void* anyways just to be sure. The segfault happens only at the fgets() call within the thread function. –  Skippy VonDrake Nov 9 '12 at 17:44
    
Note that while returning void instead of void* won't cause major issues on x86 or x86-64 (though it's still wrong), on IA64, uninitialized garbage can be deadly. –  Adam Rosenfield Nov 9 '12 at 19:07
    
@alk, My bad! I had the define "_LARGEFILE64_SOURCE" AFTER the "include <stdio.h>". Which of course wouldn't do it much good. After putting it first - like you specified - the fgets no longer segfaults. Thanks, alk, for going the extra mile! –  Skippy VonDrake Nov 9 '12 at 21:01

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