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From questions asked previously on similar lines, I can infer that since Javascript is single threaded, methods like setTimeout might come in consideration, however I don't seem to get any progressive results.My task involves DOM Manipulation, so I can't rely on HTML5 Web Workers

The problem here is about plotting big data-sets for Statistical operations like Resampling.For which we use the d3 library, on a general note which takes in the entire dataset and computes various parameters of the graph like the number of bins, scale etc. One way around lengthy loops is to break up the dataset into smaller chunks, but still the entire dataset has to be passed at once for the computation of parameters which is the bottleneck.

A good example of what I'm referring to is being used to generate graphs of github repositories(eg, https://github.com/mbostock/d3/graphs/contributors ).As we can see the plotting operations don't interfere with the browser despite being an intensive task. Any clues on how about working on similar lines?

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Was my answer helpful?? –  meetamit Nov 13 '12 at 15:52
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1 Answer

(I'm not sure that the graphs you linked to qualify as an intensive task, but regardless)

I've gotten good results by breaking up the tasks using timeouts. Say you're doing something like this:

var largeSelection = d3.selectAll('svg circle')
  .data(aReallyLargeDataset);// Expensive Bind Operation

largeSelection.enter()
  .append('circle')// Lots of appending
  .attr('r', function() { /* expensive calculations */ return ... });

largeSelection// Many refreshes
  .attr('cx', function() { /* more expensive calculations */ return ... });

That might take the browser 1 second to render (a long time, considering everything will be frozen during this task). You can make it better by breaking it up like so:

setTimeout(function() {
  var largeSelection = d3.selectAll('svg circle')
    .data(aReallyLargeDataset);// Expensive Bind Operation

  setTimeout(function() {
    largeSelection.enter()
      .append('circle')// Lots of appending
      .attr('r', function() { /* expensive calculations */ return ... });

    setTimeout(function() {
      largeSelection// Many refreshes
        .attr('cx', function() { /* more expensive calculations */ return ... });
    }, 100);

  }, 100);

}, 100);

Sorry about the obnoxious nesting and timeouts. You could refactor/abstract it in a way that's more readable/scalable. In any case, breaking up the tasks this way gives the browser a chance to "breath" and update the DOM so that, from the user's perspective, the application doesn't seem "stuck".

If that still feels sluggish, you can break things up even more:

var entering = largeSelection.enter()
  .append('circle');// Lots of appending

  setTimeout(function() {
    entering.attr('r', function() { /* expensive calculations */ return ... });
  }, 100);
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Sorry for the late response, seeing that you are familiar with d3, I've extracted some part of my code available at jsfiddle.You see, the selection as assumed by you in form of many circles isn't the issue, it's the histogram parameters binSize, interval and number of bins, all of which is computed by a single d3.layout.histogram method. I've mentioned that wrapping this in a setTimeout won't be of much help –  Ashwini Khare Nov 14 '12 at 10:13
    
Hey. Not sure: is the jsFiddle you provided supposed to be runnable? (It throws an error). The line where the histogram layout is created (which you marked "expensive operation"), how long does it actually take? I.e. if you put var t0 = Date.now(); before it and then console.log(Date.now() - t0, 'milliseconds'), what do you get? If it's over 100ms, then you do need to break it up by rewriting it. Doing so would involve copying the layout code out of the d3 source and creating a custom layout that computes itself asynchronously and calls a callback when finished. –  meetamit Nov 14 '12 at 20:24
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