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I am new to Linux. I recently ported my C++ window service to linux daemon.

In windows, I have the below folder structure. I found the structure is easy to allow other colleagues to follow and upgrade to new version.

C:\services\my_app\version_1_0\my_app.exe  
C:\services\my_app\version_1_0\my_app.config.xml  
C:\services\my_app\version_1_0\dependencies1.dll  
C:\services\my_app\version_1_0\log\my_app_20121110.log  
C:\services\my_app\version_1_0\data\my_app_data_20121110.txt  
C:\services\my_app\start_my_app.bat

I have researched a bit on where to deploy in Linux and found quite confusing:

  1. Some people say the binary should be deployed in /usr/bin/my_app
  2. The log folder should be /var/log/my_app
  3. Where should I place the data file?
  4. The start up script should be placed in /etc/init.d/my_app

Thanks for your help in advance.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You might find this Wikipedia article helpful, it explains the purpose of the various folders in a typical linux file system.

Points 1, 2 and 4 are correct: your daemon should be in /usr/bin, writing logs to /var/log and the start-up script should be in /etc/init.d.

As for the "data" file, it depends on what it actually contains. If it's something that your application uses for configuration, it should go to /etc/yourapp. Otherwise it belongs in /usr/share/yourapp.

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Thanks Grigory! My application reads some data from socket and saves it to the data file. The data needs to be read during startup if the service restarts during the day. The data is temporary and useful for the same day so I don't want to post it to database. –  alex Nov 10 '12 at 2:26
1  
In that case you can place it in /usr/share/yourapp –  Grigory Nov 10 '12 at 2:51
    
Many thanks, Grigory! –  alex Nov 10 '12 at 3:01

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