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I'm playing with some design patterns, and wanted to create an example using the SPL's observer pattern. Because it doesn't make sense to have observers and subjects be completely generic, I wanted to extend the interfaces to make them more specific to the application at hand. The problem is that when I run the code below, I get errors like "DataAccess::update() must be compatible with that of SplObserver::update()".

I know that I can make this code execute without errors by switching the method signatures to match those of the interfaces. My question is this: Why doesn't it allow children of the classes defined in the signatures? Below, ModelObserver is a SplObserver, and Model is a SplSubject. I would have expected this to work. Am I missing something?

FYI, I know I could use the explicit method signatures as defined in the interface and use the instanceof keyword in my code logic to achieve the same thing. I was just hoping to find a more elegant solution. Thanks!

<?php
interface ModelObserver extends SplObserver {
}

class DataAccess implements ModelObserver {

    /*
     * (non-PHPdoc) @see SplObserver::update()
     */
    public function update(Model $subject) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
    }
}

// Just a generic model for the example
class Model implements SplSubject {
    private $_properties = array ();
    private $_observers = array ();

    /*
     * generically handle properties you wouldn't want to do it quite like this
     * for a real world scenario
     */
    public function __get($name) {
        return $this->_properties [$name];
    }
    public function __set($name, $value) {
        $this->_properties [$name] = $value;
    }
    public function __call($method, $args) {
        if (strpos ( $method, 'get' ) === 0) {
            $name = lcfirst ( str_replace ( 'get', '', $method ) );
            return $this->_properties [$name];
        }

        if (strpos ( $method, 'set' ) === 0) {
            $name = lcfirst ( str_replace ( 'set', '', $method ) );
            $this->_properties [$name] = $args [0];
            return $this;
        }
    }
    public function __toString() {
        return print_r ( $this, true );
    }

    /*
     * (non-PHPdoc) @see SplSubject::attach()
     */
    public function attach(ModelObserver $observer) {
        $this->_observers [] = $observer;
        return $this;
    }

    /*
     * (non-PHPdoc) @see SplSubject::detach()
     */
    public function detach(ModelObserver $observer) {
        if (in_array ( $observer, $this->_observers )) {
            $f = function ($value) {
                if ($value != $observer) {
                    return $value;
                }
            };
            $observers = array_map ( $f, $this->_observers );
        }
        return $this;
    }

    /*
     * (non-PHPdoc) @see SplSubject::notify()
     */
    public function notify() {
        foreach ($this->_observers as $observer) {
            $observer->update($this);
        }
    }
}

$da = new DataAccess();

$model = new Model ();
$model->setName ( 'Joshua Kaiser' )->setAge ( 32 )->setOccupation ( 'Software Engineer' )
    ->attach($da);

echo $model;
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Limiting DataAccess::update() to accept your child Model breaks the contract of this interface.

True, all Model objects are of class SplSubject , but not all SplSubject are of class Model. An interface is a contract guaranteeing that an implementing class it supports everything the interface supports.

Your code, if it worked would be limiting the DataAccess::update() method to only the Model sub class and not the wider parent class SplSubjects . You cannot narrow the scope of the parameter passed to method defined by an interface.

Let's say you added a property public $foo to the Model class. If it were allowed, you could in your DataAccess::update() method you uses that property $foo. Someone could come along and extend SplSubjects to a child OddModel which didn't have a $foo property. They could no longer pass the OddModel into your DataAccess::update() function--if they could it would break as no $foo property exists for the OddModel.

This is the whole idea behind interfaces, by implementing they you agree 100% to support what is defined by the interface. In this case your interface says:

if you implement me, you must accept every SplSubject or class that extends SplSubject

You're implementation of the interface attempts to break the contract.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the feedback. In this case it seems to make sense that one might want to narrow the scope of the parameter to be passed, because not all SplObserver objects are necessarily geared to deal with a Model. If I cannot narrow the scope of the interface through inheritance, the next best thing I can think of is to test the instances of SplObserver and SplSubject inside the methods themselves and throw an exception if it's not a compatible observer or subject. Would you concur, or am I missing something? –  Joshua Kaiser Nov 9 '12 at 18:02
    
... and instead of redefining the method, you can simply add a check inside DataAccess. Something like : if (!$subject instanceOf Model) throw new DataAccessException('Not a valid model subject'); or something like that. –  Yanick Rochon Nov 9 '12 at 18:08
    
@JoshuaKaiser inside the methods you implement you can do what ever you want, but the whole idea is to fully support the interface. You should question why you are implementing an interface that doesn't function fully for all things required by the interface definition. An interface is a promise. If you can't keep the promise, don't use the interface. How can not all SplObserver deal with a Model? Model is of type SplSubject--they just might not handle it well, in which case, sure throw an exception –  Ray Nov 9 '12 at 18:08
    
@Ray, you make a good point. The SPL observer pattern is intentionally very generic, but it's also really, really simple. I think what would suit my purpose the best would be to just define my own interfaces that limit the specific application to the scope of subjects and observers that I would actually support for this use case. I don't like the idea of having something half way supported and relying on exceptions to handle it. Thoughts? –  Joshua Kaiser Nov 9 '12 at 18:15
1  
@JoshuaKaiser You know your application needs better than anyone, but before building your own observer pattern from scratch, question long and hard what functionality you need inside the core observer/subject roles. All the pattern is meant to do is wait until a notification. You could created an observer that does nothing unless it observes a notification from a specific subclass (but not throw an exception if no action is needed). Then stack observers to asubject by attaching to multiple observers. No Observers is required to do anything by contract.. if a tree falls in the woods... –  Ray Nov 9 '12 at 18:31

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