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I need to query a database and save over six million records for later analysis and reports using excel VBA. What would be the best way to do this ? I need to be able to access the data later, analyze it and generate reports on analyzed data ( I should be able to access the whole data locally in my system and should be able to process it fast) How good is MS access to save data if the amount of records run in to millions? I do not have a lot of experience using oracle and VBA together. Is it a good way to go if used with excel VBA? Appreciate it if anyone could give some links which might help me in the task.

Note: I don't have a choice to use another language, due to reasons beyond my control. I am reasonably good in Java, but can't use it.

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I suggest you look at SQL Server Express. A million does not say much, a million with one field (column) is one thing, a million with 50 fields is another. You should be able to connect directly to Excel. – Fionnuala Nov 9 '12 at 18:52
    
over six million, I would not recommend excel vba. I think the limit is million record in excel – Emmanuel N Nov 9 '12 at 18:55
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Try this: dba-oracle.com/art_ext_tabs_spreadsheet.htm. Alternatively, you could try something like the following: codeproject.com/Articles/25881/Bulk-Insert-using-ODP-NET - porting that from c# to vba shouldn't be too painful - sadly I don't have an oracle db to test against. – JohnLBevan Nov 9 '12 at 19:03
up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you want to manipulate more than 1 million rows of data in Excel, you should look into PowerPivot, which is an add-in for Excel 2010 (it's built into Excel 2013). It allows 100 million rows of data in addition to calculated fields on each row, although these calculations will likely be slower than the SQL backend / Excel frontend solution others have recommended.

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2013 has power pivot built-in, AFAIK. – Fionnuala Nov 9 '12 at 20:17
    
+1 for PowerPivot. – Stepan1010 Nov 9 '12 at 20:33
    
@Remou - you're right, I actually mentioned that in my answer. :-) I should point out that although it's built-in, it needs to be activated before the PowerPivot tab on the Ribbon shows up. – Kevin Pope Nov 9 '12 at 20:54
    
@KevinPope So you did, oops :) – Fionnuala Nov 9 '12 at 20:56

I need to query a database and save over six million records for later analysis and reports using excel VBA.

I would hope that the analysis will be done on a SUBSET of those records given that even with Excel 2010 you're limited to 1,048,576 rows.

I need to be able to access the data later, analyze it and generate reports on analyzed data ( I should be able to access the whole data locally in my system and should be able to process it fast) How good is MS access to save data if the amount of records run in to millions?

It'll do it. I've done it (including, many years ago, via a direct connection to an Oracle database), though the joker in the pack is the question of how many columns are in there as one of the comments alluded to. When working with massive data sets it gets pretty easy to start bumping your head on the 2GB file size limit in Access.

"Fast" is another matter. I've largely stopped working with Access because of, amongst other things, what I consider to be unacceptably slow speed when working with large data volumes. Wherever the name "JET" came from[1], it sure as Hades wasn't a metaphor for its speed.

The one advantage that Access does have is that it will allow you to pretty easily (if not quickly) produce Excel-style analysis reports (including some graphical reports) and also allow you to use VBA in the creation of them. SQL Server on the other hand, which is my data cruncher du jour, is much faster but barely has any front end at all. Probably the ideal situation would be (as also alluded to) to use either Access or Excel to do the front end and SQL Server to do the heavy lifting UNLESS (better still) you can do that lifting in Oracle rather than saving the data locally, then just have Excel/VBA create your reports on the summarised queries that you pull directly from Oracle.

I'd shy away from using Excel if the reports run to millions of lines but realistically, no report that runs that long is going to be worthwhile anyway. It's a data dump, not a report.


[1] Yes, yes, I know, Joint Engine Technology.

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It has been ACE, not Jet for more that 2 years. – Fionnuala Nov 9 '12 at 19:48
    
Not to mention the time when it was called "Access Database Engine", which was described as an "Office-specific version of" wait for it... "Jet". (office.microsoft.com/en-us/access-help/…) But the best analogy on the whole "a rose by any other name" issue was provided by Judge Kent in John W. Bradshaw vs Unity Marine Corporation Inc: "But at the end of the day, even if you put a calico dress on it and call it Florence, a pig is still a pig." Or at least it is when the number of rows that it has gets into 7 figures... – Alan K Nov 9 '12 at 20:14

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