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I have a postcondition I want to check regularly, across many methods. I'm fairly confident that I'm using the assert correctly, i.e. only checking something to make sure my code isn't doing anything stupid, and I intend to turn off the asserts after a while. But I'm not sure that the postcondition as I've written it now is exactly the condition I'll always want. So I put it into a method. But then I encountered the following issue:

public class Foo
{
    public void doSomethingRisky()
    {
        //...
        assert someBoolean();
    }

    private boolean someBoolean()
    {
        return bar && baz;
    }
}

vs.

public class Foo
{
    public void doSomethingRisky()
    {
        //...
        verifySomeBoolean();
    }

    private void verifySomeBoolean()
    {
        assert bar && baz;
    }
}

I know if I compile w/ disabled assertions, the former code will have no performance hit since someBoolean() will never get called. But is Java "smart" enough that, with assertions disabled, the second form will also have no performance hit with assertions disabled?

And the more important question, obviously, is which is better practice?

I like the assert someBoolean() because it's explicit, not subject to re- or mis-interpretation, but it seems the other form might be a little more future proof, because maybe I'll want to expand the behavior of verifySomeBoolean() to do something besides asserting the same underlying boolean. Though my gut says if that were the case, I'm better off re-coding than trying to smush the old code to fit. Any words from the wise would be much appreciated.

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1 Answer 1

I thought you did not compile out assertions? I thought they were compiled and could only be enabled by the JVM with java -ea.

In that case it would be up to the JVM to optimize out an empty call when -ea is not used. But you are pre-maturely optimizing. Make the code easy to understand and write. Then optimize second. Calling an empty method is not going to cause your performance issues.

Update:

As far as style, I would go with the asserts as close to the problem as possible. I wouldn't like the assert in a method just for the check.

Second, assert() and Guava Preconditions have two different applications. assert should be used to check that your world is still the world you thought it was. It's more of a assert (1+1 == 2) type of thing. You don't use assert()'s on callee parameters. You use assert to check something you know MUST be true, but are checking it anyways.

Guava Preconditions look to be what you should be using. This is input validation and is used to check for contract compliance. Things such as: checking null argument, negative numbers when only natural numbers should be used, a properly formatted string, etc.

In summary, assert() is the "Let me just make sure gravity is still here, even though I know it is" and the Preconditions is "Let me make sure I am trying to travel faster then the police allow"

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Yeah that's what I meant, whoops. Anyway on the particular issue of making the code easy to understand, do you have any thoughts on the two options above, or an alternate? After more reading about it I'm actually leaning towards using Guava Preconditions. –  Philip Nov 14 '12 at 5:03

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