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Does someone know of a good reference card for the memory size of python data stucture on 32 and 64 bit platforms ?

If not, this would be nice to have it on SO. The more exhaustive the better ! So how many bytes are used by those python structures (depending on the len and the content type when relevant) ?

 - int
 - float
 - reference
 - str
 - unicode string
 - tuple
 - list
 - dict
 - set
 - array.array
 - numpy.array
 - deque
 - new-style classes object
 - old-style classes object
 - ... and everything I am forgetting !

(for containers that keep only references to other objects, we obviously do not want to count the size of the item themselves, since they may be shared)

Furthermore, is there a way to get the memory used by an object at runtime (recursively or not) ?

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A lot of helpful explanations may be found here stackoverflow.com/questions/1059674/python-memory-model. I would like to see a more systematic overview, though –  LeMiz Aug 25 '09 at 23:13
    
For a NumPy array a, use a.nbytes. –  Will May 1 at 20:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 55 down vote accepted

The recommendation from an earlier question on this was to use sys.getsizeof(), quoting:

>>> import sys
>>> x = 2
>>> sys.getsizeof(x)
14
>>> sys.getsizeof(sys.getsizeof)
32
>>> sys.getsizeof('this')
38
>>> sys.getsizeof('this also')
48

You could take this approach:

>>> import sys
>>> import decimal
>>> 
>>> d = {
...     "int": 0,
...     "float": 0.0,
...     "dict": dict(),
...     "set": set(),
...     "tuple": tuple(),
...     "list": list(),
...     "str": "a",
...     "unicode": u"a",
...     "decimal": decimal.Decimal(0),
...     "object": object(),
... }
>>> for k, v in sorted(d.iteritems()):
...     print k, sys.getsizeof(v)
...
decimal 40
dict 140
float 16
int 12
list 36
object 8
set 116
str 25
tuple 28
unicode 28

2012-09-30

python 2.7 (linux, 32-bit):

decimal 36
dict 136
float 16
int 12
list 32
object 8
set 112
str 22
tuple 24
unicode 32

python 3.3 (linux, 32-bit)

decimal 52
dict 144
float 16
int 14
list 32
object 8
set 112
str 26
tuple 24
unicode 26
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, and sorry for the dupe for the second question... too bad I am using 2.5 and not 2.6... –  LeMiz Aug 25 '09 at 23:16
    
I forgot I had a virtual box with a recent ubuntu on it! That's strange, sys.getsizeof(dict) is 136 for me (python 2.6 running on a kubuntu vm, hosted by OS X, so I am not sure of anything) –  LeMiz Aug 25 '09 at 23:39
    
@LeMiz: For me (Python 2.6, Windows XP SP3), sys.getsizeof(dict) -> 436; sys.getsizeof(dict()) -> 140 –  John Machin Aug 26 '09 at 10:58
    
LeMiz-Kubuntu:python2.6 Python 2.6.2 (release26-maint, Apr 19 2009, 01:56:41) [GCC 4.3.3] on linux2 Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information. >>> import sys >>> sys.getsizeof(dict) 436 >>> sys.getsizeof(dict()) 136 –  LeMiz Aug 26 '09 at 15:43
1  
shouldn't the values be 0, 0.0, '' and u'' for consistency? –  SilentGhost Aug 26 '09 at 16:38

I've been happily using pympler for such tasks. It's compatible with many versions of Python -- the asizeof module in particular goes back to 2.2!

For example, using hughdbrown's example but with from pympler import asizeof at the start and print asizeof.asizeof(v) at the end, I see (system Python 2.5 on MacOSX 10.5):

$ python pymp.py 
set 120
unicode 32
tuple 32
int 16
decimal 152
float 16
list 40
object 0
dict 144
str 32

Clearly there is some approximation here, but I've found it very useful for footprint analysis and tuning.

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Some curiosities: most of you numbers are 4 higher; object is 0; and decimal is about 4 times larger by your estimate. –  hughdbrown Aug 26 '09 at 2:26
1  
Yep. The "4 higher" actually mostly look like "rounding up to a multiple of 8" which I believe is correct for the way malloc behaves here. No idea why decimal gets so distorted (with pympler on 2.6, too). –  Alex Martelli Aug 26 '09 at 2:40
1  
Actually, you should use pympler.asizeof.flatsize() to get a similar functionality to sys.getsizeof(). There is also an align= parameter you can use (which is 8 by default as Alex pointed out). –  Pankrat Sep 11 '09 at 19:41
    
@AlexMartelli Hi Alex! .. Why minimum size of a char in python is 25 bytes. >>> getsizeof('a') gives 25 and >>> getsizeof('ab') gives 26 ` –  Grijesh Chauhan Jan 17 '13 at 5:13

Try memory profiler. memory profiler

Line #    Mem usage  Increment   Line Contents
==============================================
     3                           @profile
     4      5.97 MB    0.00 MB   def my_func():
     5     13.61 MB    7.64 MB       a = [1] * (10 ** 6)
     6    166.20 MB  152.59 MB       b = [2] * (2 * 10 ** 7)
     7     13.61 MB -152.59 MB       del b
     8     13.61 MB    0.00 MB       return a
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Also you can use guppy module.

>>> from guppy import hpy; hp=hpy()
>>> hp.heap()
Partition of a set of 25853 objects. Total size = 3320992 bytes.
 Index  Count   %     Size   % Cumulative  % Kind (class / dict of class)
     0  11731  45   929072  28    929072  28 str
     1   5832  23   469760  14   1398832  42 tuple
     2    324   1   277728   8   1676560  50 dict (no owner)
     3     70   0   216976   7   1893536  57 dict of module
     4    199   1   210856   6   2104392  63 dict of type
     5   1627   6   208256   6   2312648  70 types.CodeType
     6   1592   6   191040   6   2503688  75 function
     7    199   1   177008   5   2680696  81 type
     8    124   0   135328   4   2816024  85 dict of class
     9   1045   4    83600   3   2899624  87 __builtin__.wrapper_descriptor
<90 more rows. Type e.g. '_.more' to view.>

And:

>>> hp.iso(1, [1], "1", (1,), {1:1}, None)
Partition of a set of 6 objects. Total size = 560 bytes.
 Index  Count   %     Size   % Cumulative  % Kind (class / dict of class)
     0      1  17      280  50       280  50 dict (no owner)
     1      1  17      136  24       416  74 list
     2      1  17       64  11       480  86 tuple
     3      1  17       40   7       520  93 str
     4      1  17       24   4       544  97 int
     5      1  17       16   3       560 100 types.NoneType
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