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I was setting up a little helper function like so:

if (!Object.prototype.__construct) {
Object.prototype.__construct = function() {
    if (typeof arguments[0] !== 'object' ||
        arguments.length === 0) return;
    for (var name in arguments[0]) {
        if (arguments[0].hasOwnProperty(name))
            this[name] = arguments[0][name];
    }
}}

if (!Object.prototype.__)
    Object.prototype.__ = Object.prototype.__construct;

It is invoked like such:

function Foo(props) {
    this.__(props); // or this.__construct(props);
    ...
}
var foo = new Foo({a:1,b:2,c:3});

As you can see, it just acts as a simple constructor. However when using it with EaselJS, specifically SpriteSheet() I get an error of Uncaught TypeError: Cannot call method 'slice' of undefined. Here is a snippet of code illustrating where the issue arises:

var ss = new SpriteSheet({
    images: ...,
    frames: {
        ...
    },
    animations: {
        walk: [0, 1, "walk", 8] // <-- Error caused here.
    }
});

So, is there a better way to go about writing an Object prototype like this, which will not cause a (presumably) clash with Easel? Or possibly a better way altogether? (Native?). Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Extending the Object prototype is a bad idea. – zzzzBov Nov 9 '12 at 20:10
    
@zzzzBov Could you please elaborate or link me to some reference? – grep Nov 9 '12 at 20:11
    
After a very brief amount of searching, I've found this article which explains some of the pros and cons, "Extending Object.prototype 'is Verboten' For some or all of these reasons, the JavaScript community has considered Object.prototype extensions taboo for several years..." – zzzzBov Nov 9 '12 at 20:18
    
Basically, if you start overriding Object.prototype you can expect libraries (such as jQuery) to start failing, and devs that view your code to start hating you. – zzzzBov Nov 9 '12 at 20:20
    
Thanks for the reference. Same reasons I would imagine. However the convenience this brings for my small project is really nice. Any ideas on how resolve besides not doing it, ha? – grep Nov 9 '12 at 20:29

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