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I have a 5000 line text document that I want to read line by line. I want to write each line to another text file depending on how many columns it has. Each column is delimited by a which is delimited by a "|" What would be the fastest way of doing this?

EDIT: I forgot the crucial detail that each the file has sections, and each section is separated by a @,#,or $. Each line must also be outputted into its appropriate section

Example:

cat File.txt

@
01|02|03|04|05|06|07|08|09|10
11|12|13|14|15|16|17|18
21|22|23|24|25
31|32|33|34|35|36|37|38|39|40
#
41|42|43|44|45|46|47|48|49|50
51|52|53|54|55
61|62|63|64|65|66|67|68
71|72|73|74|75|76|77|78|79|80

Output (3 Files for example)

cat Ten.txt

@
01|02|03|04|05|06|07|08|09|10
31|32|33|34|35|36|37|38|39|40
#
41|42|43|44|45|46|47|48|49|50
71|72|73|74|75|76|77|78|79|80

 

cat Eight.txt 
@
11|12|13|14|15|16|17|18
#
61|62|63|64|65|66|67|68

  

cat Five.txt
@
21|22|23|24|25
#
51|52|53|54|55
share|improve this question
3  
What have you tried? –  djechlin Nov 9 '12 at 20:22
3  
5000 lines is actually pretty small. Do you expect to have to do this task very often? If not, then -- why are you so concerned about the "fastest" way, rather than the "simplest" or "easiest" or "best" way? –  ruakh Nov 9 '12 at 20:23
    
Well, this problem is simplified in terms of what I actually want to do. Right now, I'm using cat file|head -$i|tail -1|tr '|' '\n'| wc -l to count the columns and putting that in a for loop and iterating that 5000 times (which I know is slow and dumb) and then putting it through if and else statements to output the file depending on the amount of columns it has –  user1813232 Nov 9 '12 at 20:31

4 Answers 4

infile.txt:

@
01|02|03|04|05|06|07|08|09|10
11|12|13|14|15|16|17|18
21|22|23|24|25
31|32|33|34|35|36|37|38|39|40
#
41|42|43|44|45|46|47|48|49|50
51|52|53|54|55
61|62|63|64|65|66|67|68
71|72|73|74|75|76|77|78|79|80
$
41|42|43|44|45|46|47|48|49|90

Long Awk one-liner (probably unnecessarily long):

awk -F "|" '{if ($0 == "@") {print $0} else {;if ($0 == "\#") {print $0} else {;if (NF == 10) {print $0};}}}' infile.txt > tens.txt

tens.txt

@
01|02|03|04|05|06|07|08|09|10
31|32|33|34|35|36|37|38|39|40
#
41|42|43|44|45|46|47|48|49|50
71|72|73|74|75|76|77|78|79|80
$
41|42|43|44|45|46|47|48|49|90

Then change the clause (NF == 10) to what ever you want each time you run it.

share|improve this answer

Here's a one-liner to do it with awk to find all the lines with 10 columns:

awk -F'|' '{if (NF==10) {print $0} }'

More generally:

#!/bin/bash

awk -F'|' -v cols=$1 '{if (NF==cols) {print $0} }'
share|improve this answer

Something along the lines of this might work:

awk -F\| '{ print > "columns-" + NF + ".dat"}' File.txt

It doesn't translate the numbers into English, but it would write each line to a file named, e.g. columns-10.dat for lines that have 10 columns...

share|improve this answer
    
Does print > append or overwrite the files? –  sampson-chen Nov 9 '12 at 20:37
    
@sampson-chen Within awk, it seems to append, at least in the short test I ran... Not sure awk even supports any fancier redirections than that... –  twalberg Nov 9 '12 at 20:38
2  
creates new per each invocation of awk, but appends during the same invocation. Good luck to all. –  shellter Nov 9 '12 at 20:41
  • use awk
  • set delimiter
  • print lines with columns number larger or equal N.

For example:

$> awk -F "|" '{if (NF >= 10) {print}}' File.txt
01|02|03|04|05|06|07|08|09|10
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