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I have this code in my main()

public static void main(String[] args) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        Customer forrest = new Customer("Forrest Gump", 1, "42 New Street, New York, NY"); 
        Customer random = new Customer("Random Name", 2, "44 New Street, New York, NY"); 
...
}

how can i proceed to writing code so it returns an instance of the customers given an id number (say 1 given returns forrest, 2 given returns random)

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closed as too localized by Erick Robertson, user133466, Ed Staub, Roddy of the Frozen Peas, Matti Lyra Nov 9 '12 at 21:59

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Are you saving the Customer in a database? Otherwise the Customers forrest and random only exist in the scope of the main method. –  Roddy of the Frozen Peas Nov 9 '12 at 20:24
    
@RoddyoftheFrozenPeas hmmm... for now im just manually adding customers (there are only 2 customers in this case), later I might try writing an Customer input interface...i'd like to get an universal approach, suppose idk the instance name of the 1st customer was Forrest, how do i make the program return Forrest given the int id was 1? –  user133466 Nov 9 '12 at 20:25
4  
You're confusing class names and variable names. In Java, it's standard practice to capitalize class names but not variable names. Forrest and Random should not be capitalized. So this is confusing because you are returning Customer, which seems to be a class itself. I think you want to return Forrest, there actually. But this error would stand out a lot better following capitalization standards. –  Erick Robertson Nov 9 '12 at 20:27

7 Answers 7

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Use static fields or if it may throw an exception write static block in your class. Please never start variable name from capital letter.

class MainClass{
    // All uppercase because it is constant
    private static final Customer FORREST = new Customer("Forrest Stallings", 1, "42 New Street, New York, NY"); 
    private static final Customer RANDOM = new Customer("Random Name", 2, "44 New Street, New York, NY"); 

     public static void main(String[] args) {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub

 }

If you want to return class

 Class returnClass(){
 if(sth)
    return Customer.class;
 else
    return Random.class;
 }
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can you take a look again at the code, I've added some details to make my question more clear –  user133466 Nov 9 '12 at 21:02

In this case your return statement should be object of type.

Example:

return new Customer();

Unless Customer and Random related (inheritance), you may NOT be able to write a method which returns both types.

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i'd like to get an universal approach, suppose idk the instance name of the 1st customer was Forrest, how do i make the program return Forrest given the int id was 1? –  user133466 Nov 9 '12 at 20:27

I'm not sure what are you asking. I suspect you are going to return instance of the class, created object. Then write return Forrest; Forrest object is visible only in method main scope

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i'd like to get an universal approach, suppose idk the instance name of the 1st customer was Forrest (neither do i know the instance name of the 2nd customer was Random), how do i make the program return Forrest given the int id was 1 –  user133466 Nov 9 '12 at 20:29
    
can you take a look again at the code, I've added some details to make my question more clear –  user133466 Nov 9 '12 at 21:01
static Customer GetCustomer(int id)

The return type of this method doesn't mean that you have to return the Customer class.

It means that, it should return a reference to an object of class Customer, or a subclass of Customer.

So, your return statement should be like: -

return new Customer(id);

And, based on the method, it seems like it should return an already existing Customer object with that id. For e.g., if you have a List<Customer>, then you would need to find out from that list a Customer object having the given id.

Now, given that in your main method, you have created two Customers - forrest and random. You need to save those references in some persistence storage, either a List<Customer> or some database. And to get the reference pointing to an object based on some id, you would have to fetch it from the persistence storage in use.


In your case, since you want to fetch the object based on id, you can maintain a Map<Integer, Customer> to store your Customers with their particular id.

static Map<Integer, Customer> map = new HashMap<Integer, Customer>();

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Customer forrest = new Customer("Forrest Stallings", 1, "42 New Street, New York, NY"); 
    Customer random = new Customer("Random Name", 2, "44 New Street, New York, NY"); 

    map.put(1, forrest);
    map.put(2, random);
}

And then in your getCustomer method, just get the customer for the id passed as parameter:-

public Customer getCustomer(int id) {
    return map.get(id);
}

So, you don't need to do a test on the id for any value. It will automatically fetch the corresponding Customer for that id.

For e.g.: -

getCustomer(1);

Will return the object pointed to by forrest reference.

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can you take a look again at the code, I've added some details to make my question more clear –  user133466 Nov 9 '12 at 20:59

When you create your Customer objects in main, they only exist in main unless you save them somewhere.

For example:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Customer c = new Customer ( ... );
    // c exists here
}
public static void doSomething() {
    // c does not exist here
}

Unless you save your new objects into a database or a data structure, you won't be able to do some sort of "lookup" on them.

Here's an example where you can save the Customers based on their ids in a HashMap:

private HashMap<Integer, Customer> records = new HashMap<Integer, Customer>();

public void doSomething() {
    Customer forrest = new Customer(1); 
    Customer random = new Customer(2);

    // put the customers in the HashMap:
    records.put(1, forrest);
    records.put(2, random);

    // to get them out:
    records.get(1); // returns forrest
    records.get(2); // returns random
}
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can you take a look again at the code, I've added some details to make my question more clear –  user133466 Nov 9 '12 at 20:59
    
@user133466 -- Why don't you just modify the Customer class to hold a BankAccount object? eg. public class Customer{ private BankAccount account; ... } ? –  Roddy of the Frozen Peas Nov 9 '12 at 21:08
    
i actually have 4 BankAccount object in the Customer class. A more detailed code can be found here stackoverflow.com/questions/13316042/… –  user133466 Nov 9 '12 at 21:10
    
@user133466 - So if you have the bank account in the customer, and you have the customer, why don't you just query the customer for its bank account? eg. customer.getAccountC() ?? –  Roddy of the Frozen Peas Nov 9 '12 at 21:13

if GetCustomer was an instance method, it would be:

Customer GetCustomer(int id){
    Customer result = null;

    if(id == 1){
        result = Forrest ;
    }else if(id == 2){
        result = Random;
    }

    return result;
}

but you can't access instance variables from a static method, like you are trying to

So what you might want to do is construct each object within the method rather than rely on their existing instance:

static Customer GetCustomer(int id){
        Customer result = null;

        if(id == 1){
            result = new Customer("Forrest Stallings", 1, "42 New Street, New York, NY"); 

        }else if(id == 2){
            result = new Customer("Random Name", 2, "44 New Street, New York, NY");
        }

        return result;
    }
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can you take a look again at the code, I've added some details to make my question more clear –  user133466 Nov 9 '12 at 21:03

I think you can make the classes as class variables:

 private static Customer forest; 
 private static Customer random; 

 public static void main(String[] args) {
    forrest = new Customer("Forrest Stallings", 1, "42 New Street, New York, NY"); 
    random = new Customer("Random Name", 2, "44 New Street, New York, NY"); 
    ...
  }

Then:

 static Customer GetCustomer(int id){
    if(id == 1){
       return customer;
    }else if(id == 2){
       return random;
    }
  }
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can you take a look again at the code, I've added some details to make my question more clear –  user133466 Nov 9 '12 at 21:02
    
@user133466: Do you mean there are Forrest and Random sub classes of Customer class and based on the id being passed, you want to instantiate the right class? –  Yogendra Singh Nov 9 '12 at 21:10
    
forrest and random are instances of the class Customer. Sorry for capitalizing them. A more detailed code can be found here: stackoverflow.com/questions/13316042/… –  user133466 Nov 9 '12 at 21:13
    
@user133466 I just answered that question. Please check the answer and let me know, if that doesn't help. –  Yogendra Singh Nov 9 '12 at 21:19

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