Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to test this method:ArrayList<File> songs;

public void playRandomSong()
{
    Random random = new Random();
    int iNextSong = random.nextInt(songs.size());
    File songToPlay = songs.get(iNextSong);
    if (mediaPlayer != null && mediaPlayer.isPlaying())
        mediaPlayer.stop();
    mediaPlayer = new MediaPlayerImpl(songToPlay, new WhenDone());
    mediaPlayer.play();
    currentSong = songToPlay;
}

I'm thinking in this way: Run the method multiple times and see if it returns one of the elements more than once. But how would I write that in code?

share|improve this question
    
What is your exact problem? –  Heskja Nov 9 '12 at 20:44
    
No problem, the method works as it should. But im quite new to programming and now im trying to learn unit testing. And thats why i want to write a test for this method. My mediaplayer only play every song once. So what i mean is that, if if returns one of the element more than once, then the test should pass. Is it maybe possible to have a counter for this ? –  Henrik Nov 9 '12 at 20:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Random does not guarantee that it will not return the same value twice... So you can not test "see if it returns one of the elements more than once"

If you need that you will have to implement a Set around the Random, but be aware of the Birthday paradox...

I think you have 2 options:

1 : You may try to seed your Random, so you can predict the sequence...

2 : Remove the Random and make use of the [Collections.shuffle][1] to shuffle you arrayList

With Option 1 you will have to change the signature of your method.

With Option 2 you will also play every song once.

share|improve this answer
    
My mediaplayer only play every song once. So what i mean is that, if if returns one of the element more than once, then the test should pass. Is it maybe possible to have a counter for this? –  Henrik Nov 9 '12 at 20:54
    
As i said, Random does not guarantee this, you will have to program it like that. –  Frank Nov 9 '12 at 22:01

I see another problem in your code: if you want to play songs in random order you are doing that in wrong way. This algorithm should not repeat song until all songs in list are played. To achieve that there is an algorithm called Knuth shuffling. You can take it from Collections class: java.util.Collections#shuffle.

share|improve this answer

Instead of creating a RNG in your method

public void playRandomSong() {
  Random random = new Random();
  ...
}

you should pass the source of randomness in

public void playRandomSong(Random random) {
  ...
}

and then you can generate a Random instance with a known seed in your unit test to get repeatable but typical results.

public void testPlayRandomSong() {
  Random random = new Random(0xd5021e90339050ab);

  // Test that 1000 runs plays each song roughly the right number of times.
  ...
}
share|improve this answer

Here is an article on randomness testing that you might find useful:

http://beust.com/weblog/2012/02/20/various-ways-to-get-randomness-wrong/

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.