Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am working on a Windows Phone 7 Application using Local SQLite Database and I'm having an issue with the rendering time of pages that use DataBinding.

Currently it takes 60-70ms to retrieve the data from the database. Then it takes about 3100ms to render the data retrieved using a ListBox with DataBinding.

Here you can see the DataTemplate of the ListBox:

<DataTemplate x:Key="ListBoxItemTemplate">
    <Grid>
        <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
            <ColumnDefinition Width="68" />
            <ColumnDefinition />
        </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>

        <TextBlock x:Name="TimeColumn"
                        Text="{Binding TimeSpan}" Grid.Column="0" Grid.Row="0"
                        Foreground="White" HorizontalAlignment="Center" VerticalAlignment="Center" />
        <TextBlock Text="{Binding Stop.StopName}" Grid.Column="1" Grid.Row="0" 
                                Margin="15,0,0,0" TextWrapping="NoWrap" Foreground="Black"
                                HorizontalAlignment="Left" VerticalAlignment="Center" />
    </Grid>
 </DataTemplate>

Comment: I have tried it using Canvas instead of Grid too, same result.

Then, the database loads data into a CSList (using ViciCoolStorage) and that gets Binded to the ListBox:

StationList.ItemsSource = App.RouteViewModel.RouteStops;

Comment: I have tried to add the elements of the CSList to an ObservableCollection and bind that to the interface but didn't seem to change anything.

Question: Am I doing something wrong that results in a huge load time - even if just loading 10 elements -, or this is normal? Do you have any recommendations to get a better performance with DataBinding?

Thank you for your answers in advance!

Corresponding Code Parts:

RouteViewModel.cs

private Route rRoute;
public Route Route
{
    get
    {
        if (rRoute != null)
        {
            return rRoute;
        }
        else
        {
            return new Route();
        }
    }
}

public void LoadRoute(string index)
{
    try
    {
        if (rRoute.RouteId != index)
        {
            RouteLoaded = false;
            StationsLoaded = false;
            TimetableLoaded = false;
        }
    }
    catch (Exception) { }

    this.index = index;

    if (!RouteLoaded)
    {
        NotifyPropertyChanging("Route");
        rRoute = Route.ReadSafe(index);
        RouteLoaded = true;
        NotifyPropertyChanged("Route");
    }
}

private CSList<RouteTime> rtLine;
public CSList<RouteTime> RouteStops
{
    get
    {
        if (rtLine != null)
        {
            return rtLine;
        }
        else
        {
            return new CSList<RouteTime>();
        }
    }
}

public void LoadRouteStops()
{
    LoadRoute(index);

    if (!this.StationsLoaded)
    {
        NotifyPropertyChanging("RouteStops");
        rtLine = rRoute.RouteTimes.FilteredBy("DirectionId = @DirectionId", "@DirectionId", this.direction).OrderedBy("TimeSpan");
        NotifyPropertyChanged("RouteStops");

        StationsLoaded = true;
    }
}

RouteView.xaml.cs

private string index;
private bool visszaut = false;

public RouteView()
{
    InitializeComponent();
    Loaded += new System.Windows.RoutedEventHandler(RouteView_Loaded);
}

void RouteView_Loaded(object sender, System.Windows.RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    DataContext = App.RouteViewModel;
}

protected override void OnNavigatedTo(NavigationEventArgs e)
{
    NavigationContext.QueryString.TryGetValue("index", out index);

    App.RouteViewModel.LoadRoute(index);
    App.RouteViewModel.Direction = Convert.ToInt32(visszaut);
    App.RouteViewModel.LoadRouteStops();
    StationList.ItemsSource = App.RouteViewModel.RouteStops;
}

RouteTime.cs - Class Implementation

[MapTo("RouteTimes")]
public class RouteTime : CSObject<RouteTime, int>
{
    public int RouteTimeId
    {
        get
        {
            return (int)GetField("RouteTimeId");
        }
        set
        {
            SetField("RouteTimeId", value);
        }
    }

    public int RouteId
    {
        get
        {
            return (int)GetField("RouteId");
        }
        set
        {
            SetField("RouteId", value);
        }
    }

    public int StopId
    {
        get
        {
            return (int)GetField("StopId");
        }
        set
        {
            SetField("StopId", value);
        }
    }

    public int TimeSpan
    {
        get
        {
            return (int)GetField("TimeSpan");
        }
        set
        {
            SetField("TimeSpan", value);
        }
    }

    public Direction DirectionId
    {
        get
        {
            return (Direction)GetField("DirectionId");
        }
        set
        {
            SetField("DirectionId", value);
        }
    }

    [OneToOne(LocalKey = "StopId", ForeignKey = "StopId")]
    public Stop Stop
    {
        get
        {
            return (Stop)GetField("Stop");
        }
        set
        {
            SetField("Stop", value);
        }
    }

    [ManyToOne(LocalKey = "RouteId", ForeignKey = "RouteId")]
    public Route Route
    {
        get
        {
            return (Route)GetField("Route");
        }
        set
        {
            SetField("Route", value);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Okay so, in this scenario it seems the source of the slow rendering was the [OneToOne] connection between the RouteTime and Stop classes. If I bind to any of the variables that is stored in the linked class, the rendering takes a long time.

Fixed by

I have added a new partial class in the code where I need to show the results.

public partial class StopTimes
{
    public int TimeSpan
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    public string StopName
    {
        get;
        set;
    }
}

Using an ad-hoc query in Vici CoolStorage, I've made my own query to request the data needed and viola, everything is there and rendering didn't take more then 1 second. Perhaps, during the rendering it requests the StopName field with an SQLQuery one by one?

Don't know, but thank you for your help anyway :)

share|improve this answer
add comment

DataBinding should not be the problem in this scenario - I never had any problems with it. It has something to do with your SQL DB for sure. I had lists of around 200 items, and it rendered fine under a reasonable time-slot of 100ms.

It either is your SQL implementation or you are using ViciCoolStorage wrong. Post your code.

share|improve this answer
    
I have added the corresponding code parts to the post. It contains the class implementation of the objects rendered on the page, the ViewModel which loads the data from the database and the view itself. In the meantime, I'll try to search for another SQLite Library and test the code with it. –  Bhawk1990 Nov 10 '12 at 11:56
add comment

Have you tried doing the filtering of your list outside of the LoadRouteStops() method? Maybe in the code behind instead of the viewModel? It seems like a lot of work to be done in between propertyChanging and propertyChanged notifications.

share|improve this answer
    
It seems like I have found the source of the problem, I have added an answer to the question. Thank you for your help! –  Bhawk1990 Nov 13 '12 at 14:40
add comment

I'm confused: How do you do local SQLite on Windows Phone 7? Did you mean WP8 where this is supported? In any case, consider using LongListSelector (built into WP8 - Toolkit in WP7), since it does a better job with virtualization when you have a lot of items to render.

share|improve this answer
    
I am a Windows Phone 7 developer, and I am using Vici CoolStorage to connect to the database. link –  Bhawk1990 Nov 13 '12 at 14:05
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.