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Could anyone suggest what is the best way to implement frame-based animation in svg, based on JPEG's?

One example which I've found is this:

<svg version="1.1" baseProfile="tiny" id="svg-root"
  width="100%" height="100%" viewBox="0 0 480 360"
  xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink">

   <image width="320" height="240" xlink:href="test1.jpg">
      <animate id='frame_0' attributeName='display' values='inline;none'
               dur='0.5s' fill='freeze' begin="0s" repeatCount="indefinite"/>
   </image>

   <image width="320" height="240" xlink:href="test2.jpg">
      <animate id='frame_1' attributeName='display' values='none;inline'
               dur='0.5s' fill='freeze' begin="0.5s" repeatCount="indefinite" />
   </image>

</svg>

It works for 2 frames, but doesn't really scale. I would like to have something which can handle 100 frames and more.

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2 Answers 2

It's much easier:

<svg version="1.1" baseProfile="tiny" id="svg-root"
  width="100%" height="100%" viewBox="0 0 480 360"
  xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink">

  <image width="320" height="240" xlink:href="test1.jpg">
    <animate attributeName="xlink:href" 
      values="test1.jpg;test2.jpg" 
      begin="0s" repeatCount="indefinite" dur="1s"/>
  </image>

</svg>
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This only works in Firefox. Original code works in FF and Chrome :-| –  BarsMonster Nov 10 '12 at 9:30
    
Interesting, I tested Firefox, Chromium and Opera on Linux, all three of them worked! But indeed, Chrome and Safari on Windows don't, for some reason. –  Thomas W Nov 10 '12 at 13:07
    
A possible downside to doing it this way is that the frames won't be preloaded. –  Erik Dahlström Nov 11 '12 at 15:53
2  
So, what about throwing all the images into one long JPG strip that works effectively like a traditional film strip and do an animateTransform with keyframes and calcMode="discrete"? Around this there could be an SVG element that establishes a viewport inside which the strip "moves". Hope this makes sense. –  Thomas W Nov 11 '12 at 19:50
    
Thanks for this answer, @ThomasW. FWIW, you can get pre-loading by putting the individual frames into a <defs> block. A strip of images is ok for a few frames, and that's commonly done for CSS sprites, but it's not a suitable technique for larger anims, since browsers may not load such large images correctly, as I recently discovered. –  PM 2Ring Jul 22 at 15:21

An alternative approach,

If your animation is working, but it's just a matter of too much production to get the files setup, you can use a template to generate your SVG.

Use something like Grunt.Js to read all the images in a directory and then, have an underscore template build the SVG frames the way you already have them setup from an array of the filepaths.

These code snippets might not work out of the box, but it's pretty close.

Here the grunt file grabs the files in the folder, check if they're images then pushes them to an array.

// gruntfile.js //

var fs = require('fs');
var path = require('path');
var _ = require("underscore");

grunt.registerTask('Build Animated SVG', function () {

    var template = grunt.file.read("/path to SVG underscore template/");    //see SVG section below.

        var frames = [];
        var pathtoframes = "mypath";
        var mySVG = "mysvg.svg";

        fs.readdirSync(path.resolve(pathtoframes)).forEach(function (file) {

            if (filetype == "svg" || filetype == "png" || filetype == "jpg" || filetype == "gif") {
                var frame = {};
                frame.src = pathtoframes + "/" + file;
                frames.push(frame);
            }
        });

var compiledSVG = _.template(template, {frames:frames});

grunt.file.write(path.resolve(pathtoframes) + "/compiled_" + mySVG, compiledSVG);

});

This template will get read in by the grunt file, and underscore will loop through each file and write that into a big string. Grunt then saves that out as an SVG that you can load.

<!-- SVG underscore template -->
    <svg version="1.1" baseProfile="tiny" id="svg-root"
          width="100%" height="100%" viewBox="0 0 480 360"
          xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink">

          <% _.each(frames, function(frame, index){ %>
             <image width="320" height="240" xlink:href="<%= frame.src %>">
                <animate 
                         id='frame_<%= index %>' 
                         attributeName='display' 
                         values='none;inline'
                         dur='0.5s' 
                         fill='freeze' 
                         begin="0.5s" 
                         repeatCount="indefinite" 
                         />
            </image>
        <% } %>
    </svg>
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