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Having the following DDL in MySql 5.5.x.

create table if not exists t1 (col1 int);

and

CREATE PROCEDURE my_proc()
BEGIN
      select inexistent_column from t1;       
END;

Why the procedure is created without errors? I expect it to throw that inexistent_column is not known or does not exists. How can I make MySql sql compiler check for table definitions?

UPDATE: Rephrase

I just want a way to avoid a typo in a column while developing, meaning, creating a brand new procedure. Is there any way to do this? Maybe that should've been the question to ask from the start.

share|improve this question
2  
The procedure body is only parsed for syntax. It is not evaluated until one calls the procedure. Indeed, schema could change in between successive procedure calls: should MySQL drop existing procedures just because they reference a no-longer valid schema? – eggyal Nov 9 '12 at 21:42
    
and as a follwup to eggyal, consider where a db is being reloaded from a dump. a sproc might be created that refers to a table/field that hasn't been reloaded yet. skipping the sproc because of that "error" would be bad, because that table/field WILL be loaded later as the dump gets processed. – Marc B Nov 9 '12 at 21:46
    
Ok, both of you are correct. I just want a way to avoid a typo in a column while developing, meaning, creating a brand new procedure. Is there any way to do this? – user1154664 Nov 9 '12 at 22:16

The server will only do syntax checking, but you can check for the existence of columns yourself. All existing tables and columns are defined in the information_schema.

You could use a query like this to check if your column exists:

SELECT * 
FROM information_schema.COLUMNS 
WHERE 
    TABLE_SCHEMA = 'your_database_name' 
AND TABLE_NAME   = 'your_table_name' 
AND COLUMN_NAME  = 'some_column'
share|improve this answer
    
Or else just declare a handler for SQLSTATE '42S22'. – eggyal Nov 9 '12 at 21:57

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