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I'm trying to make a Perl script that will run a set of other programs in Windows. I need to be able to capture the stdout, stderr, and exit code of the process, and I need to be able to see if a process exceeds it's allotted execution time. Right now, the pertinent part of my code looks like:

...
        $pid = open3($wtr, $stdout, $stderr, $command);
        if($time < 0){
            waitpid($pid, 0);
            $return = $? >> 8;
            $death_sig = $? & 127;
            $core_dump = $? & 128;
        }
        else{
            # Do timeout stuff, currently not working as planned
            print "pid: $pid\n";
            my $elapsed = 0;
            #THIS LOOP ONLY TERMINATES WHEN $time > $elapsed ...?
            while(kill 0, $pid and $time > $elapsed){
                Time::HiRes::usleep(1000);  # sleep for milliseconds
                $elapsed += 1;
                $return = $? >> 8;
                $death_sig = $? & 127;
                $core_dump = $? & 128;
            }
            if($elapsed >= $time){
                $status = "FAIL";
                print $log "TIME LIMIT EXCEEDED\n";
            }
        }
        #these lines are needed to grab the stdout and stderr in arrays so 
        #  I may reuse them in multiple logs
        if(fileno $stdout){
            @stdout = <$stdout>;
        }
        if(fileno $stderr){
            @stderr = <$stderr>;
        }
...

Everything is working correctly if $time = -1 (no timeout is needed), but the system thinks that kill 0, $pid is always 1. This makes my loop run for the entirety of the time allowed.

Some extra details just for clarity:

  • This is being run on Windows.
  • I know my process does terminate because I have get all the expected output.
  • Perl version: This is perl, v5.10.1 built for MSWin32-x86-multi-thread (with 2 registered patches, see perl -V for more detail) Copyright 1987-2009, Larry Wall Binary build 1007 [291969] provided by ActiveState http://www.ActiveState.com Built Jan 26 2010 23:15:11
  • I appreciate your help :D

For that future person who may have a similar issue I got the code to work, here is the modified code sections:

        $pid = open3($wtr, $stdout, $stderr, $command);
        close($wtr);
        if($time < 0){
            waitpid($pid, 0);
        }
        else{
            print "pid: $pid\n";
            my $elapsed = 0;
            while(waitpid($pid, WNOHANG) <= 0 and $time > $elapsed){
                Time::HiRes::usleep(1000);  # sleep for milliseconds
                $elapsed += 1;
            }

            if($elapsed >= $time){
                $status = "FAIL";
                print $log "TIME LIMIT EXCEEDED\n";
            }
        }
        $return = $? >> 8;
        $death_sig = $? & 127;
        $core_dump = $? & 128;
        if(fileno $stdout){
            @stdout = <$stdout>;
        }
        if(fileno $stderr){
            @stderr = <$stderr>;
        }
        close($stdout);
        close($stderr);
share|improve this question
    
Windows doesn't have signals. Perhaps you shouldn't use them to figure out if a process is running. –  ikegami Nov 9 '12 at 21:56
1  
kill - Returns the number of processes successfully signaled (which is not necessarily the same as the number actually killed). –  Ron Bergin Nov 9 '12 at 22:00
    
@ikegami, perlport says Win32 implements kill(0, ...) semantics. –  pilcrow Nov 9 '12 at 22:07
1  
huh? You do waitpid. Actually, why are you suing kill at all? Why not using a nohang waitpid? –  ikegami Nov 9 '12 at 22:27
1  
Problems in code in the update: You access $? even when you don't use waitpid (so it contains garbage). You deadlock if the child fill up the buffer of the pipe on its STDOUT. Same goes for STDERR. (These deadlocks will result in a "false" timeout.) You don't kill the child on timeout. You should use IPC::Run. –  ikegami Nov 11 '12 at 1:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Instead of kill 0, use waitpid $pid, WNOHANG:

use POSIX qw( WHOHANG );

if (waitpid($pid, WNOHANG) > 0) {
   # Process has ended. $? is set.
   ...
}
share|improve this answer

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