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I have the following class for which I wish to create a series of instances:

function rashnik(size, name) {
    var img = document.createElement('img');
    img.src = "pics/"+name+".jpg";
    img.height = size;
    img.width = size;
    img.id = name;
    d = 300-size;
    img.style.marginBottom = d/2;
    img.style.marginLeft = 50;
    var gal = document.getElementById("gallery");
    gal.appendChild(img);
};

Now, Iv'e created this function to create the instances:

function creater(names) {// the argument "names" would be a two-dimensional array 
    for (var a = 0; a < names.length; a++){
        var names[a][0] = new rashnik(names[a][1], names[a][0]); // right here is where I get the error
    }
}

And this is how I try to call it:

var friends = [["adi","300"],["tom","200"],["sleg","100"],["dorc","50"],["dork","25"]];
creater(friends);

The thing is, the var names[a][0] part throws me an error, which I totally understand; I want to create an object whose name is the same as the string stored in names[a][0], but, well, it just doesn't work that way. Does anyone have an idea as to what I could to to make it happen?

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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Cleaned up. I think this is doing what you want:

  • Create a new class instance in the loop, so it's an object
  • Put something in that object. I put the img in as an example.
  • Use the name as the "key" of a returning object. I access that in the alert in the code below by using resultsView['adi'] but could have also done resultsView.Adi

http://jsfiddle.net/w7wKW/

function rashnik(size, name)
{
var img=document.createElement('img');
img.src = "pics/"+name+".jpg";
img.height = size;
img.width = size;
img.id = name;
d = 300-size;
img.style.marginBottom = d/2;
img.style.marginLeft = 50;
var gal = document.getElementById("gallery");
gal.appendChild(img);

    this.img = img;
    return this;
};


function creater(names)
{//the argument "names" would be a two-dimensional array
    var results = { };
for(var a=0; a<names.length; a++)
{
results[names[a][0]] = new rashnik(names[a][1], names[a][0]);
}

    return results;
}

var friends = [["adi","300"],["tom","200"],["sleg","100"],["dorc","50"],["dork","25"]];
var resultsValue = creater(friends);

alert(resultsValue['adi'].img.src);
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Thanks, that did it. Could you explain why? Especially the result = {} part? –  Tomcatom Nov 9 '12 at 22:08
1  
result = { }; creates an empty object. I could have done result = { hello: 'world' } after which I could have done result.hello or result['hello'] to access the string world. If this answers your question, please accept the answer, thanks! –  Eli Gassert Nov 9 '12 at 22:10
    
Ok, I get it now. thanks a lot! (btw, I wanted to accept your answer but had to wait a minimum of time before I could do so. S.O rules...) –  Tomcatom Nov 9 '12 at 22:13
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