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I'm facing a bit of problem with the following casting:

    class A 
    { 
    }

    class B : A 
    {
    }

    class C<T> where T : A
    {
        protected T property { get; set; }
    }

    class D : C<B> 
    {
    }

    class MainClass
    {
        public static void Main (string[] args)
        {
            C<A> x = new D();
            // Error CS0029: Cannot implicitly convert type `SampleApp.D' to `SampleApp.C<SampleApp.A>' (CS0029) (SampleApp)
        }
    }

I don't understand why this is failing since D is wider than C<A> since it implements C<B>, and B : A. Any workarounds?

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By default, C<B> is not a subtype of C<A>. If you want covariance, you need to declare it explicitly by using interfaces and the out keyword. –  Heinzi Nov 9 '12 at 22:59
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you can use C# 4.0, you can write the following code.

class A { }
class B : A {}

interface IC<out T> {}
class C<T> :IC<T> where T : A { protected T property { get; set; }  }

class D : C<B> {}

class MainClass {
    public static void Main()
    {
        IC<A> x = new D();
    }
}
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This is the correct answer as long as defining and referencing the interface is allowed by the OP's requirements. –  Steve Konves Nov 9 '12 at 22:37
    
Thanks Nick, you nailed it. Some further reading online explained more what's going on. –  Candide Nov 9 '12 at 23:04
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Let's name your classes Animal for A, Barker for B, and Dog for D.

Actually C<Animal> is wider than Dog : C<Barker>. Assume you have public property Me of type T and assignment possible:

C<Animal> a = new Dog();
a.Me = Elephant; // where Elephant inherited from Animal

Oops! Dog is parametrized with Barker. Have you seen barking elephants?

You need to declare some covariant interface to allow assignment of class instantiated with more derived type argument C<Barker> to object instantiated with less derived type argument C<Animal>. You can use empty interface, like @NickW suggested, but you will not be able to do something with instance of that interface (it's empty!). So, let's do something like that:

interface IC<out T>
    where T : Animal
{
    IEnumerable<T> Parents(); // IEnumerable is covariant
    T Me { get; } // no setter
}

class C<T> : IC<T>
    where T: Animal
{
    // implementation
}

class D : C<Barker>
{
    // implementation
}

Above scenario is still impossible, but now you can

IC<Animal> a = new Dog();
foreach(var parent in a.Parents)
     Console.WriteLine(parent);

Console.WriteLine(a.Me);
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I found your answer entertaining and thought provoking. However, it explains why you can't move side-to-side in the inheritance hierarchy, but not vertically. I think the problem falls here: C<A> y = new C<B>();. The covariance B -> A can be inferred. It feels like the compiler is being lazy, and wanting me to manually specify the covariance with out. –  Candide Nov 9 '12 at 23:00
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You can't do that because the Generics are actualy templates and they don't act like what you want to do with them. Let me show you by this:

When you say "C<A>" it means a generic class by a "parameter" of "A". BUT When you say "D" it means exactly "D"!

So D is not equal to a generic class by a parameter of A. As you can simply see it in the result of ToString function on both types (by using typeof).

Hope it helps

Cheers

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