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When the user enters information for a friend, I want the pointer to allocated appropriate space and the friend information be stored in this allocated space. i've read snippits other places that mention using a buffer array as an argument to scanf, but I'm just having a putting this all together. Here is what I have so far.

#include <stdio.h>  
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <conio.h>


//Structure for contacts
typedef struct friends_contact{

   char *First_Name;
   char *Last_Name;
   char *home;
   char *cell;
 }fr;

void menu(fr*friends ,int* counter,int user_entry,int i);
void setFirst(fr*,int *,int i);
char getFirst(fr*,int i);
void add_contact(fr*friends,int* counter,int i);
void print_contact(fr*friends ,int* counter, int i);

int main() 
{

  int user_entry=0;
  fr friends[5];
  int buffer[50];
  int counter=0;
  int i=0;
   for(i=0;i<5;i++)
    {
     friends[i].First_Name = (char*) malloc(sizeof(char) * 64); 
     free(friends[i].First_Name);
    }    
  menu(friends, &counter,user_entry,i);
  getch();
  return 0;
}
 //Menu function
 void menu(fr*friends,int* counter,int user_entry, int i) 
{

   do{
      int result;

      printf("\nPhone Book Application\n");
      printf("1) Add friend\n2) Delete friend\n3) Show a friend\n4)" 
      "Showonebook\n5)Exit\n");   
      scanf("%d", &user_entry);

         if(user_entry==1)
            {
            add_contact(friends,counter,i);
            }
            if(user_entry==2)
            {

            } 
            if(user_entry==3)
            {


            }                  
            if(user_entry==4)
            {
            print_contact(friends, counter,i);
            } 
       }while(user_entry!=5);                 
}

void setFirst(fr*friends, int* counter, int i) 
{
    //malloc issue **
    friends=(fr*) malloc(sizeof(fr));

    printf("Enter a first name \n");
    scanf("%s",friends[*counter].First_Name);



}
char getFirst(fr*friends , int pos) 
{

    printf("%s ", friends[pos].First_Name);
    return *friends[pos].First_Name;
}
void add_contact(fr*friends,int* counter,int i) 
{

    setFirst(friends,counter,i); 
    (*counter)++;
}
void print_contact(fr*friends ,int* counter, int i) 
{

  for( i = 0; i < *counter; i++)
    if (strlen(friends[i].First_Name))
    {
        getFirst(friends, i);
    }
 }

This is only part of the code obviously, and as of right now I get a segmentation fault after I enter a name into the add name function. It loops to the menu one last time before quitting. I realize that I have gone wrong somewhere, and I would like to try and fix this with the buffer solution. Solutions anyone?

share|improve this question
    
can you fix your formatting/indenting. –  Mitch Wheat Nov 9 '12 at 23:28
    
yes sorry, the whole copy paste thing got a little weird with me. –  user1781966 Nov 9 '12 at 23:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your fr variable is a pointer to some location on the stack that's already got space allocated. You shouldn't be using that - it's already initialized and you can't malloc it (or at least you never ever should). You should instead pass a pointer and initialize it.

That is to say:

fr *friends;

And then when you want to allocate space

friends = (fr*) malloc(sizeof(fr)* NUMBER OF FR YOU WANT);

Furthermore, you need to initialize the elements of your structure if you want to use them, since they're all pointers. This would be done similarly

friends[i].First_Name = (char*) malloc(sizeof(char)* (LENGTH OF STRING + 1));

Or it would be friends[i]->First_Name depending on how you've sent it along to your function.

A good solution for you would just be to initialize the members of the struct inide your main

int i;
fr friends[5];
for(i=0;i<5;i++)
{
   friends[i].First_Name = (char*) malloc(sizeof(char) * 64);
   friends[i].Last_Name = (char*) malloc(sizeof(char) * 64);
   friends[i].home = (char*) malloc(sizeof(char) * 64);
   friends[i].cell = (char*) malloc(sizeof(char) * 64);
}
//
//Do functions (without malloc'ing)
//
for(i=0;i<5;i++)
{
   free(friends[i].First_Name);
   free(friends[i].Last_Name);
   free(friends[i].home);
   free(friends[i].cell);
}

Here I've chosen 64 to be the length of string. You can set it to whatever you think works.

The bottom line is that you have to allocate space for a pointer before you can use it. Otherwise it's not pointing to any memory you can use and you'll get a segmentation fault. Also, don't forget to free once you're done with the memory you've allocated. Do remember that you can't use it once you've freed it (unless you malloc it again).

share|improve this answer
    
Ok let me see if I have this straight, in my main function your saying i need to change fr friends[5] to fr*friends and then in the setFirst function I need to add friends[i].First_Name = (char*) malloc(sizeof(char)* (LENGTH OF STRING + 1)); followed by friends = (fr*) malloc(sizeof(fr)* NUMBER OF FR YOU WANT);? again forgive my lack of knowledge, this is all in the name of trying to learn something new. –  user1781966 Nov 9 '12 at 23:53
    
interesting... is it supposed to be fr[i].info or friends[i].info because when i try to run it as above it I get the compiler error expected primary-expression before '[' token –  user1781966 Nov 10 '12 at 0:24
    
Goodness I can't believe I did that. Yes it should be friends because that's the variable - fr is the type. Sorry. Trying to help you figure this out - you don't need me messing up. –  GraphicsMuncher Nov 10 '12 at 0:27
    
haha no worries, kinda glad I was able to catch that rather then just stare at my computer blankly. Now let me ask you this, just for my own benefit of trying to understand this further, lets say I put free(friends[i].First_Name) in the same loop as the malloc wouldn't this delete the user info right away? Meaning as soon as a name is entered, would it be deleted from the phonebook therefore never showing up? It's not really relevant other then the fact that i've already tried it the name still shows up in the phonebook and i'm just curious as to why. –  user1781966 Nov 10 '12 at 0:34
    
Where are you putting it exactly? free releases any memory you've malloc'd. If you never access it again after you free it, you won't hit errors, although it's best to systematically free things. Also if this question is more involved, it'd probably be better to ask another question rather than make a bunch of comments. –  GraphicsMuncher Nov 10 '12 at 0:46

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