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I have a simple GUI which contains:

  • a push button.
  • Two radio buttons

Now I want to listen to each one of these buttons. What I do is something like that:

public class TestApp implements ActionListener {

    private JFrame frame;
    private JButton btn;
    private JRadioButton rdb1;
    private JRadioButton rdb2; 

    public static void main(String[] args) { /*....*/ }

    private void initialize() {
       //Each time I add a button, I add it to the listener:
       btn = new JButton("Button");
       btn.addActionListener(this);
       //..
       rdb1 = new JRadioButton("Value1");
       rdb1.addActionListener(this);
       //And so on...
    }

    //The ActionEvents  
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
       if(e.getSource()==btn)
       //...
       if(e.getSource()==rdb1)
       //...        
    }
}

Now I want to know if this considered a good/bad style?

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closed as not constructive by duffymo, Nate W., Pops, Nimit Dudani, Jaguar Nov 10 '12 at 7:33

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Compared to what? –  duffymo Nov 9 '12 at 23:45
    
To nothing, I want to know in general if it is bad or good. –  Maroun Maroun Nov 9 '12 at 23:47
3  
Exposing your ActionListener by having your main public class implement ActionListener is bad style. Better to switch to an inner class or an anonymous class –  Robin Nov 9 '12 at 23:53
    
I'm just wondering...why are you complicating your life? Simply, use anonymous classes. –  Branislav Lazic Nov 9 '12 at 23:54
    
I'm not very familiar with anonymous classes, I'll read about it and I'll know what's it's advantages :) Thanks –  Maroun Maroun Nov 10 '12 at 0:01

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Unless the listener is a very long method, I personally prefer the anonymous class pattern:

        final JButton btn = new JButton("Button");
        final JRadioButton rdb1 = new JRadioButton("Value1");
        final ActionListener listener = new ActionListener() {
            @Override
            public void actionPerformed(final ActionEvent e) {
                if (e.getSource() == btn) {
                    //...
                } else if (e.getSource() == rdb1) {
                    //...        
                }
            }
        };
        btn.addActionListener(listener);
        rdb1.addActionListener(listener);

or even better:

    btn.addActionListener(new ActionListener (){
         public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {      
             // btn handling code
             }
    });
    rdb1.addActionListener(new ActionListener (){
         public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {      
             // rdb1 handling code
             }
    });

The pattern you are using allows other class to set the class TestApp to be set as a listener by other classes - unless this is intended, it is not a good practice.

share|improve this answer
    
@thdayofcondor No. +1 Now :) –  Branislav Lazic Nov 10 '12 at 0:03
    
If my listener is long, should I keep it like I showed it above? Or it is still better to have anonymous class? –  Maroun Maroun Nov 10 '12 at 0:07
    
@Maroun85 I think you should always use anonymous classes. –  Branislav Lazic Nov 10 '12 at 0:07
1  
A long listener inside a method will make the method long and confusing, but non-anonymous classes pollutes your namespace –  thedayofcondor Nov 10 '12 at 0:09
3  
@Strawberry yes, and having an if -else to determine what control generated the event is clumsy, but unfortunately it is a pattern found in many tutorials –  thedayofcondor Nov 10 '12 at 0:19

A lot comes down to the complexity of what the action listener is trying to do. If you want small, single use actions, then an anonymous class would suitable.

The main benefit of using this style of listener is it will isolate exactly what the action is doing and who it's doing it for. The drawback comes when the listener contains more then, say, 10 or more lines, as it starts to becoming difficult to read and know where the listener actually ends.

In this case, something like a inner class might be more suitable. It has the benefit of an anonymous class (being tied to the class that uses it), but is easier to read.

If you want reusable actions (think of things like open, new, save), then you're better off using the Action API, which provides self configurability as well a self contained action listener

IMHO

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1  
"If you want reusable actions.." Note that each Action might be used for both a button (or a save button in the main window, as well as in a couple of dialogs) & menu item. That settles the matter, for my tastes. –  Andrew Thompson Nov 10 '12 at 0:39
1  
@AndrewThompson and key bindings ;) –  MadProgrammer Nov 10 '12 at 0:41
    
"key bindings" Oh yeah.. :) –  Andrew Thompson Nov 10 '12 at 0:42

More object-oriented way is to create an anonymous class for implementation of each of the listeners.

Creating only one listener that switches on the event source component is not very readable, but moreover, when the number of listeners increases, it becomes error prone. You can easily forget to handle all of the possible event sources in the switch block (or a chain of if-else blocks), which will result in a runtime exception silent wrong behaviour (nothing would happen for that case).

Adding individual listeners to each of the components will give you compile-time checking that you haven't forgotten to handle all of them.

public class TestApp {

    // you can initialize fields inline to make thing shorter and safer
    private JButton btn = new JButton("Button");
    private JRadioButton rdb1 = new JRadioButton("Value1");

    private void initialize() {
        btn.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
            @Override
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
                // something
            }
        });
        rdb1.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
            @Override
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
                // something else
            }
        });
    }
}

Because the anonymous class syntax is very verbose, you can shorten the code of the initialize method by moving the listeners into private fields.

public class TestApp {

    private JButton btn = new JButton("Button");
    private JRadioButton rdb1 = new JRadioButton("Value1");

    private void initialize() {
        btn.addActionListener(btnListener);
        rdb1.addActionListener(rb1Listener);
    }

    private final ActionListener btnListener = new ActionListener() {
        @Override
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
            // something
        }
    };

    private final ActionListener rb1Listener = new ActionListener() {
        @Override
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
            // something else
        }
    };
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for eradicating the if's –  Strawberry Nov 10 '12 at 0:08
2  
"most object-oriented" I would debated that. Your answer does not allow for inheritance of the implemented class. A more OO approach would be to use a separate dedicated class that implements ActionListener or the Action API - IMHO - please not, I'm not questioning your answer, which is correct for given use case –  MadProgrammer Nov 10 '12 at 0:38
1  
Well, maybe not "most object-oriented", but definitely "more object-oriented" than one method that would switch on the source. OOP vs. procedural approaches usually differ in using polymorphism vs. conditions and switches when implementing different behaviour under different conditions. –  Natix Nov 10 '12 at 1:14

You can think about two other ideas:

  1. Give each UI element its own Listener; they're completely independent that way.
  2. Inject the Listeners into your Swing UI rather than calling new. You give users the opportunity to change the behavior as they see fit. Let your Swing UI do what it was meant to do: display results. That's it. I would argue that Listeners are part of the Controller logic.
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It depends to a certain extent on what you want to do in the actionPerformed method. If no other class is likely to want to call this method then I may be tempted to reduce the scope of the actionPerformed method by creating an inner class e.g.:-

public class TestApp {

    private JFrame frame;
    private JButton btn;
    private JRadioButton rdb1;
    private JRadioButton rdb2; 

    private class CombinedActionListener implements ActionListener {
         public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
             if(e.getSource()==btn)
             //...
             if(e.getSource()==rdb1)
             //...        
             }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) { /*....*/ }

    private void initialize() {
       ActionListener listener = new CombinedActionListener()

       //Each time I add a button, I add it to the listener:
       btn = new JButton("Button");
       btn.addActionListener(listener);
       //..
       rdb1 = new JRadioButton("Value1");
       rdb1.addActionListener(listener);
       //And so on...
    }
}

You could even make the listener class a static inner class or a top-level class by passing the button instances into the constructor - which would make the listener class easier to test.

As I said above though, this is largely dependent on i) if anyone else is likely to call this method and ii) the complexity of the logic inside the method.

share|improve this answer
    
Well explained, thank you. –  Maroun Maroun Nov 10 '12 at 0:00
1  
But anonymous class per button is probably the best approach as per other answers. –  Strawberry Nov 10 '12 at 0:06
    
@Strawberry that's contextual. In the case presented it might be, but the use of anonymous is not always appropriate –  MadProgrammer Nov 10 '12 at 0:34
    
@MadProgrammer You are correct. I typically use anonymous classes only in the simplest cases (which I was assuming here). I will generally break out into static inner classes or package-private top-level classes if there is any complex or collaborative logic. My emphasis is being able to test the logic. –  Strawberry Nov 10 '12 at 0:42

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