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I am trying to do some analytics against a large dictionary created by reading a file from disk. The read operation results in a stable memory footprint. I then have a method which performs some calculations based on data I copy out of that dictionary into a temporary dictionary. I do this so that all the copying and data use is scoped in the method, and would, I had hoped, disappear at the end of the method call.

Sadly, I am doing something wrong. The customerdict definition is as follows (defined at top of .py variable):

customerdict = collections.defaultdict(dict)

The format of the object is {customerid: dictionary{id: 0||1}}

There is also a similarly defined dictionary called allids.

I have a method for calculating the sim_pearson distance (modified code from Programming Collective Intelligence book), which is below.

def sim_pearson(custID1, custID2):
si = []

smallcustdict = {}
smallcustdict[custID1] = customerdict[custID1]
smallcustdict[custID2] = customerdict[custID2]

#a loop to round out the remaining allids object to fill in 0 values
for customerID, catalog in smallcustdict.iteritems():
    for id in allids:
        if id not in catalog:
            smallcustdict[customerID][asin] = 0.0

#get the list of mutually rated items
for id in smallcustdict[custID1]:
    if id in smallcustdict[custID2]:
        si.append(id) # = 1

#return 0 if there are no matches
if len(si) == 0: return 0

#add up all the preferences
sum1 = sum([smallcustdict[custID1][id] for id in si])
sum2 = sum([smallcustdict[custID2][id] for id in si])

#sum up the squares
sum1sq = sum([pow(smallcustdict[custID1][id],2) for id in si])
sum2sq = sum([pow(smallcustdict[custID2][id],2) for id in si])

#sum up the products
psum = sum([smallcustdict[custID1][id] * smallcustdict[custID2][id] for id in si])

#calc Pearson score
num = psum - (sum1*sum2/len(si))
den = sqrt((sum1sq - pow(sum1,2)/len(si)) * (sum2sq - pow(sum2,2)/len(si)))

del smallcustdict
del si
del sum1
del sum2
del sum1sq
del sum2sq
del psum

if den == 0:
    return 0

return num/den

Every loop through the sim_pearson method grows the memory footprint of python.exe unbounded. I tried using the "del" method to explicitly delete local scoped variables.

Looking at taskmanager, the memory is jumping up at 6-10Mb increments. Once the initial customerdict is setup, the footprint is 137Mb.

Any ideas why I am running out of memory doing it this way?

share|improve this question
    
Thanks dm03514 - I tried that, and it didn't make a difference. – Brandon Watson Nov 10 '12 at 1:03
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try changing the following two lines:

smallcustdict[custID1] = customerdict[custID1]
smallcustdict[custID2] = customerdict[custID2]

to

smallcustdict[custID1] = customerdict[custID1].copy()
smallcustdict[custID2] = customerdict[custID2].copy()

That way the changes you make to the two dictionaries do not persist in customerdict when the sim_pearson() function returns.

share|improve this answer
    
Not to get all weird on you, but I love you. :) This appears to have solved my memory problem. I see now that by having the list comprehension that added the 0.0 values, I was writing to the main customerdict, which is why the memory was growing unbound. It had nothing to do with not releasing the memory, I was writing to the object because the reference was passed, not the value. Thank you so much for helping me see that. – Brandon Watson Nov 11 '12 at 2:18
    
@BrandonWatson: You're certainly welcome. The changes suggested are to negate the only thing the function does that could affect the amount of memory that was allocated after it was done. For the same reason, you don't need all those del statements further down because they're all for local variables so it happens automatically. – martineau Nov 11 '12 at 8:10

I presume the issue is here:

smallcustdict[custID1] = customerdict[custID1]
smallcustdict[custID2] = customerdict[custID2]

#a loop to round out the remaining allids object to fill in 0 values
for customerID, catalog in smallcustdict.iteritems():
    for id in allids:
        if id not in catalog:
            smallcustdict[customerID][asin] = 0.0

The dictionaries from customerdict are being referenced in smallcustdict - so when you add to them, you they persist. This is the only point that I can see where you do anything that will persist out of scope, so I would imagine this is the problem.

Note you are making a lot of work for yourself in many places by not using list comps, doing the same thing repeatedly, and not making generic ways to do things, a better version might be as follows:

import collections
import functools
import operator

customerdict = collections.defaultdict(dict)

def sim_pearson(custID1, custID2):

    #Declaring as a dict literal is nicer.
    smallcustdict = {
        custID1: customerdict[custID1],
        custID2: customerdict[custID2],
    }

    # Unchanged, as I'm not sure what the intent is here.
    for customerID, catalog in smallcustdict.iteritems():
        for id in allids:
            if id not in catalog:
                smallcustdict[customerID][asin] = 0.0

    #dict views are set-like, so the easier way to do what you want is the intersection of the two.
    si = smallcustdict[custID1].viewkeys() & smallcustdict[custID2].viewkeys()

    #if not is a cleaner way of checking for no values.
    if not si:
        return 0

    #Made more generic to avoid repetition and wastefully looping repeatedly.
    parts = [list(part) for part in zip(*((value[id] for value in smallcustdict.values()) for id in si))]

    sums = [sum(part) for part in parts]
    sumsqs = [sum(pow(i, 2) for i in part) for part in parts]
    psum = sum(functools.reduce(operator.mul, part) for part in zip(*parts))

    sum1, sum2 = sums
    sum1sq, sum2sq = sumsqs

    #Unchanged.
    num = psum - (sum1*sum2/len(si))
    den = sqrt((sum1sq - pow(sum1,2)/len(si)) * (sum2sq - pow(sum2,2)/len(si)))

    #Again using if not.
    if not den:
        return 0
    else:
        return num/den

Note that this is entirely untested as the code you gave isn't a complete example. However, It should be easy enough to use as a basis for improvement.

share|improve this answer
    
So what code change would you recommend? – Brandon Watson Nov 10 '12 at 1:19
    
@BrandonWatson It's hard to know without knowing what you are trying to do here. I don't know what allids or asin are, and what you are doing. The question is, do you need to be adding these values to customerdicts's children? – Gareth Latty Nov 10 '12 at 1:24
    
You did a bunch of new things here, which I am going to try and parse, and learn new stuff. Thanks for that. In your simplification of the sums and sumsqs, I don't have the individual values for the "den" variable assignment. Am I missing something, – Brandon Watson Nov 10 '12 at 1:49
    
@BrandonWatson Nope, I missed expanding them out, edited in now. You might want to modify the maths at the end to be more generic (if applicable) using the data structures directly rather than unpacking them like I did in my edit. – Gareth Latty Nov 10 '12 at 1:55
    
I'm not sure what you did or how you did it...there's loads of fun syntax you put in there. I don't even understand the sum1, sum2 = sums line, or how to go about looking that up. That said, it appears that the memory problem has been solved. The footprint is now bouncing up and down, but it has an upward bias and eventually runs out of memory. I have added a counter variable to see how far into the 61600 operations I get. I will also add some perf counters, but this way seems slower. – Brandon Watson Nov 10 '12 at 2:40

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