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SO,

I've created a four-column fluid-width layout for a site, and I'm working on placing a fluid square DIV within one of my columns. There are a few techniques I've found to achieve this - namely, setting padding-bottom to the same percentage as the width - but none of these seem to work when the DIV contains content.

Is there a way to maintain a 1:1 (square) ratio on a fluid DIV when that DIV contains content?

Here's my HTML:

<div id="leftmostcolumn">
<div id="logo"></div>
</div>
<div id="leftcolumn"></div>
<div id="rightcolumn"></div>
<div id="rightmostcolumn"></div>

And my CSS:

body {
width: 100%;
height: 100%;
background-color: red;
}

#leftmostcolumn {
position: absolute;
top: 0;
left: 0;
width: 25%;
height: 100%;
background-color: blue;
}

#leftcolumn {
position: absolute;
top: 0;
left: 25%;
width: 25%;
height: 100%;
background-color: green;
}

#rightcolumn {
position: absolute;
top: 0;
left: 50%;
width: 25%;
height: 100%;
background-color: yellow;
}

#rightmostcolumn {
position: absolute;
top: 0;
left: 75%;
width: 25%;
height: 100%;
background-color: gray;
}

#logo {
width:100%;
padding-bottom:100%;
background-color: #aa2d2d; 
color: white;    
}

​​ And here's a JsFiddle.

The DIV "logo" is the one I'm trying to maintain as a square. Right now, I've used the padding-bottom approach but that doesn't do the trick when there's content in the DIV. Any input is greatly appreciated!

Marca

EDIT:

Getting there...I'm adapting a script I found to find the width of the DIV and then apply that value to the height to keep it a square. However, as it stands now the script doesn't constantly resize the DIV, and it won't allow it to shrink below a certain size. Any thoughts on how to correct either of these issues?

HTML:

<div id="box"></div>

CSS: ​ #box { width: 75%; height: 50px; background-color: black; }​

JQUERY:

$("#box").css("height", function() { 
return $(this).width();
});

JsFiddle is here.

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2 Answers 2

This is something I've actually been messing around with for a while, and have come up with a quasi (but not entirely) hacky, CSS-only solution that seems to work on most browsers in the past decade. The trick is to use images, and positioning in a tricky fashion. Consider the following (simplification) of your code.

Markup:

<div class="sqr_box">
    your content goes here!
</div>

CSS:

.sqr_box
{
    width: 50%; /* or 100px, or 20em, or whatever you want */
    border: solid 2px pink;
    background-color: grey;
    color: white;
}

Now, we can't set the height in terms of percent, so we won't; instead, first we'll go into Photoshop, and make an image that is 2x2 px, transparent, or background-colored. Next we'll add the following to your markup:

<div class="sqr_box">
    <img src="images/sizers/2x2.png" class="sizer">
    <div class="content">your content goes here!</div>
</div>

and THIS to your CSS:

.sqr_box
{
    width: 50%; /* or 100px, or 20em, or whatever you want */
    position: relative; /* static positioning is less than ideal for this scenario */
}

.sqr_box > img.sizer
{
    display: block; /* images default to an inline-block like thing */
    width: 100%;
    height: auto; /* CLUTCH!!! this ensures that the image's height changes to maintain proportions with it's width */
    visibility: hidden;
}

.sqr_box > .content
{
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;

    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;  /* Our parent element now has a dynamically assigned height, this will work */

    border: solid 2px pink;
    background-color: grey;
    color: white;
}

Best of all, this will work for any sized ratio of box you'd want! Just change the proportions of the image!

Hope this is all still relevant to you, 3 months later.

-Sandy

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Put all four columns in one div. set that div to 100% width and set the font size to 100em

Have each of your four columns have a width of 25em instead of 25%

Have your logo width and height set to 25em each

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