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#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <math.h>

int main()
{
    int i = 0, len1=0, len2=0;
    int BUFSIZE = 1000;
    char* string1[20];
    char* string2[20];
    FILE *fp1 = fopen("input1.txt", "r");
    FILE *fp2 = fopen("input2.txt", "r");
    if ((fp1 == 0)||(fp2 == 0)){
        fprintf(stderr, "Error while opening");
        return 0;
    }
    string1[i] = (char*)malloc(BUFSIZE);
    string2[i] = (char*)malloc(BUFSIZE);
    while (fgets(string1[i], BUFSIZE, fp1)) {
        i++;
        len1+=strlen(string[i]);
        string1[i] = (char*)malloc(BUFSIZE);
        len1+=strlen(string1[i]);
    }

    i = 0;
    while (fgets(string2[i], BUFSIZE, fp2)) {
        i++;
        string2[i] = (char*)malloc(BUFSIZE);
    }

    printf("Output: \n");
    srand(time(NULL));
    int j = rand()%i;
    int k = (j+1)%i;
    fflush(stdout);
    printf("%d - %s %d -%s", j, string1[j], k, string1[k]);
    printf("%d - %s %d -%s", j, string2[j], k, string2[k]);
    printf("\n");
    printf("%d", len1);

    int x;
    for(x = 0; x<i; x++){
        free(string1[x]);
        free(string2[x]);
    }
    scanf("%d", x);
    fclose(fp1);
    fclose(fp2);
    return 0;
}

Thanks to user1807597's help, I finally realize reading two strings and storing into arrays. But I still have trouble in getting the length of the array, I try to put len+=strlen(string[i]); in the while loop, but the compiler breaks when debugging. Someone knows why? Thank you!

share|improve this question
    
First, compilers do not "break" when debugging; your program does. Second, if your program breaks (seg-faults) while debugging, it means you have a significant and critical error; usually involving writing to, or reading from, memory you don't own. I suggest you study what the debugger reports for the reason it stopped your program prematurely. –  WhozCraig Nov 10 '12 at 2:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I have modified the code.I think now it's ok.You have wrong counting in the first while loop.And i++ should come after len1+=strlen(string[i]);.In the last scanf statement scanf("%d", x);,you have missed the operator '&'.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <math.h>

int main()
{
    int i = 0, len1 = 0, len2 = 0;
    int BUFSIZE = 1000;
    /*
       you have too  few lines here,
       If my file contains more than 20 lines,tragedy will occur!
       */
    char* string1[20];
    char* string2[20];

    FILE* fp1 = fopen("input1.txt", "r");
    FILE* fp2 = fopen("input2.txt", "r");

    if ((fp1 == 0) || (fp2 == 0))
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Error while opening");
        return 0;
    }
    string1[i] = (char*)malloc(BUFSIZE);
    string2[i] = (char*)malloc(BUFSIZE);

    while (fgets(string1[i], BUFSIZE, fp1)!=NULL)
    {
        /*
        i++;
        */

        len1 += strlen(string1[i]);
        i++;
        string1[i] = (char*)malloc(BUFSIZE);
    }

    i = 0;
    while (fgets(string2[i], BUFSIZE, fp2))
    {
        i++;
        string2[i] = (char*)malloc(BUFSIZE);
    }

    printf("Output: \n");
    srand(time(NULL));
    int j = rand() % i;
    int k = (j + 1) % i;
    fflush(stdout);
    printf("%d - %s %d -%s", j, string1[j], k, string1[k]);
    printf("%d - %s %d -%s", j, string2[j], k, string2[k]);
    printf("\n");
    printf("%d", len1);

    int x;
    for (x = 0; x < i; x++)
    {
        free(string1[x]);
        free(string2[x]);
    }
    /*
    scanf("%d", x);
    */
    scanf("%d",&x);
    fclose(fp1);
    fclose(fp2);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This answer would be more helpful if you mention what was wrong with the program in the first place. –  kjw0188 Nov 10 '12 at 2:37
    
Thank you for reminding me! –  prehistoricpenguin Nov 10 '12 at 2:38
    
Thank you very much, chm! Thanks for your correction and detailed instruction. And about the lines, my files are unlikely to have too many lines, 3 or 4 lines at most, I guess:) –  phil Nov 10 '12 at 4:19

You have two main choices for the length of the array.

  1. You make it big enough that you don't think you'll ever use more entries.

    enum { MAX_LINES = 16 * 1024 };
    char *lines[MAX_LINES];
    size_t num_lines = 0;
    
  2. You do dynamic allocation of the array.

    char **lines = 0;
    size_t max_lines = 0;
    size_t num_lines = 0;
    
    ...
    
    if (num_lines >= max_lines)
    {
        size_t new_lines = max_lines * 2 + 2;
        char **space = realloc(lines, new_lines * sizeof(*space));
        if (space == 0)
            ...deal with out of memory...
        lines = space;
        max_lines = new_lines;
    }
    

Both systems work. Dynamic allocation is a little more fiddly the first few times you do it, but you don't run into problems until you run out of memory, and it takes a long time to run out of memory these days. Fixed allocation may run out of space if you guess wrong, and nominally wastes memory if you only deal with small files. The 'wasted' memory is usually very small these days.

Which is better depends on the scale of the problems you expect your program to deal with. If they'll be small, a fixed but generous allocation is sensible and easier. If they'll be large, the dynamic allocation is more sensible.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, good examples, Jonathan. –  WhozCraig Nov 10 '12 at 2:44
    
Very good examples! Thank you Jonathan. However, chm modified the code for me, so I accepted his answer, sorry... –  phil Nov 10 '12 at 4:22

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