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This is my current exception handling code.

Take especial note of the line throw e; marked with ***.

try
{
  //some code that could cause exception
}
catch (FaultException e) //first catch a particular type of exception only
{
  if (Regex.IsMatch(e.Message, "something")) //satisfying a particular condition
  {
    Console.WriteLine("Particular exception occurred.");
    return;
  }
  else
    throw e; // <-- *** Problem! Not getting caught by the "catch" below.
}
catch (Exception e) //catch all other exceptions
{
  Console.WriteLine("General exception ocurred");
  return;
}

The problem is this: If the throw e; // <-- *** occurs, it is not getting caught by the final catch. Instead, the app just crashes as if the exception was not handled.

How can this be fixed in the simplest possible way?

You see in the first catch that I'm only interested in actually handling FaultException exceptions satisfying a particular condition, but leave all others (both FaultException exceptions not satisfying the condition and exceptions that are not FaultException) to the final catch. Unfortunately, this is not working properly.

I'm on .NET 4.

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At first glance I'd say the problem is you are rethrowing the FaultException so the base Exception catch will never catch it. Also this is a really really weird thing to want to do. What are you actually trying to accomplish? –  asawyer Nov 10 '12 at 2:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Only one catch block is executed per try block.

I would rewrite the catch block as:

catch (Exception e)
{
    if (e is FaultException && Regex.IsMatch(e.Message, "something"))
    {
        ....
    }
    else // all other exceptions
    {
        ....
    }
}
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I think what he wanted to do was actually do something if it's a FaultException, and then do something for all Exceptions, even if it's a FaultException - so maybe lose the else. –  jrajav Nov 10 '12 at 2:32
    
Kiyura, note the return after Console.WriteLine("Particular exception occurred."); –  Ilya Kogan Nov 10 '12 at 2:36

You don't fully understand the try/catch syntax. You can attach multiple catches to a single try - the one that matches most closely is the one that will be selected. In this case, FaultException's catch will fire, and then the more general Exception one will never be called, because the exception has already been handled.

What you need to do is wrap the entire try/catch in another try/catch specifically for the more general Exception case, if you always want to handle that; either that or rework your logic. (For instance, you could just simplify it to be an Exception catch and then check if it's a FaultException.)

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The throw e will never be caught by exception catches at the same level.

A throw inside of a catch, will always throw to the invoker of the method.

Also, its recommended that if you want to re-throw do throw instead of throw e. The first case preserves the call-stack.

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If you throw an exception within a catch block, it won't be caught within the same try-catch.

You could repeat in the else condition what you're doing in the other catch block (not too bad in this specific case).

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