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What is the easiest way to pass an AngularJS scope variable from directive to controller? All of the examples that I've seen seem so complex, isn't there a way I can access a controller from a directive, and set one of it's scope variables?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 77 down vote accepted

Edited on 2014/8/25: Here was where I forked it.

Thanks @anvarik.

Here is the JSFiddle. I forgot where I forked this. But this is a good example showing you the difference between = and @

<div ng-controller="MyCtrl">
    <h2>Parent Scope</h2>
    <input ng-model="foo"> <i>// Update to see how parent scope interacts with component scope</i>    
    <br><br>
    <!-- attribute-foo binds to a DOM attribute which is always
    a string. That is why we are wrapping it in curly braces so
    that it can be interpolated. -->
    <my-component attribute-foo="{{foo}}" binding-foo="foo"
        isolated-expression-foo="updateFoo(newFoo)" >
        <h2>Attribute</h2>
        <div>
            <strong>get:</strong> {{isolatedAttributeFoo}}
        </div>
        <div>
            <strong>set:</strong> <input ng-model="isolatedAttributeFoo">
            <i>// This does not update the parent scope.</i>
        </div>
        <h2>Binding</h2>
        <div>
            <strong>get:</strong> {{isolatedBindingFoo}}
        </div>
        <div>
            <strong>set:</strong> <input ng-model="isolatedBindingFoo">
            <i>// This does update the parent scope.</i>
        </div>
        <h2>Expression</h2>    
        <div>
            <input ng-model="isolatedFoo">
            <button class="btn" ng-click="isolatedExpressionFoo({newFoo:isolatedFoo})">Submit</button>
            <i>// And this calls a function on the parent scope.</i>
        </div>
    </my-component>
</div>
var myModule = angular.module('myModule', [])
    .directive('myComponent', function () {
        return {
            restrict:'E',
            scope:{
                /* NOTE: Normally I would set my attributes and bindings
                to be the same name but I wanted to delineate between
                parent and isolated scope. */                
                isolatedAttributeFoo:'@attributeFoo',
                isolatedBindingFoo:'=bindingFoo',
                isolatedExpressionFoo:'&'
            }        
        };
    })
    .controller('MyCtrl', ['$scope', function ($scope) {
        $scope.foo = 'Hello!';
        $scope.updateFoo = function (newFoo) {
            $scope.foo = newFoo;
        }
    }]);
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13  
Great explanation and example! I wonder why the documentation is so complex?... Or is it that i'm not that great a programmer? –  kshep92 Mar 8 '13 at 14:19
2  
Note that this fiddle works as in, but if you change the angular version to a more recent one (ie from 1.0.1 to 1.2.1), it won't work anymore. Something must have changed about the syntax. –  eremzeit Feb 22 at 23:32
    
What's changed is in 1.2 isolate scopes are isolated to its template, and this example does not use a template. Move the code into a template and it will work. See stackoverflow.com/a/20936387/903943 –  event_jr Jun 10 at 11:52
    
You forked it from here: onehungrymind.com/angularjs-sticky-notes-pt-2-isolated-scope –  anvarik Aug 22 at 9:07
1  
Finally a clear example that makes sense. 2hr headache solved in 10 seconds. –  Chris Oct 7 at 18:11

Wait until angular has evaluated the variable

I had a lot of fiddling around with this, and couldn't get it to work even with the variable defined with "=" in the scope. Here's three solutions depending on your situation.


Solution #1


I found that the variable was not evaluated by angular yet when it was passed to the directive. This means that you can access it and use it in the template, but not inside the link or app controller function unless we wait for it to be evaluated.

If your variable is changing, or is fetched through a request, you should use $observe or $watch:

app.directive('yourDirective', function () {
    return {
        restrict: 'A',
        // NB: no isolated scope!!
        link: function (scope, element, attrs) {
            // observe changes in attribute - could also be scope.$watch
            attrs.$observe('yourDirective', function (value) {
                if (value) {
                    console.log(value);
                    // pass value to app controller
                    scope.variable = value;
                }
            });
        },
        // the variable is available in directive controller,
        // and can be fetched as done in link function
        controller: ['$scope', '$element', '$attrs',
            function ($scope, $element, $attrs) {
                // observe changes in attribute - could also be scope.$watch
                $attrs.$observe('yourDirective', function (value) {
                    if (value) {
                        console.log(value);
                        // pass value to app controller
                        $scope.variable = value;
                    }
                });
            }
        ]
    };
})
.controller('MyCtrl', ['$scope', function ($scope) {
    // variable passed to app controller
    $scope.$watch('variable', function (value) {
        if (value) {
            console.log(value);
        }
    });
}]);

And here's the html (remember the brackets!):

<div ng-controller="MyCtrl">
    <div your-directive="{{ someObject.someVariable }}"></div>
    <!-- use ng-bind in stead of {{ }}, when you can to avoids FOUC -->
    <div ng-bind="variable"></div>
</div>

Note that you should not set the variable to "=" in the scope, if you are using the $observe function. Also, I found that it passes objects as strings, so if you're passing objects use solution #2 or scope.$watch(attrs.yourDirective, fn) (, or #3 if your variable is not changing).


Solution #2


If your variable is created in e.g. another controller, but just need to wait until angular has evaluated it before sending it to the app controller, we can use $timeout to wait until the $apply has run. Also we need to use $emit to send it to the parent scope app controller (due to the isolated scope in the directive):

app.directive('yourDirective', ['$timeout', function ($timeout) {
    return {
        restrict: 'A',
        // NB: isolated scope!!
        scope: {
            yourDirective: '='
        },
        link: function (scope, element, attrs) {
            // wait until after $apply
            $timeout(function(){
                console.log(scope.yourDirective);
                // use scope.$emit to pass it to controller
                scope.$emit('notification', scope.yourDirective);
            });
        },
        // the variable is available in directive controller,
        // and can be fetched as done in link function
        controller: [ '$scope', function ($scope) {
            // wait until after $apply
            $timeout(function(){
                console.log($scope.yourDirective);
                // use $scope.$emit to pass it to controller
                $scope.$emit('notification', scope.yourDirective);
            });
        }]
    };
}])
.controller('MyCtrl', ['$scope', function ($scope) {
    // variable passed to app controller
    $scope.$on('notification', function (evt, value) {
        console.log(value);
        $scope.variable = value;
    });
}]);

And here's the html (no brackets!):

<div ng-controller="MyCtrl">
    <div your-directive="someObject.someVariable"></div>
    <!-- use ng-bind in stead of {{ }}, when you can to avoids FOUC -->
    <div ng-bind="variable"></div>
</div>

Solution #3


If your variable is not changing and you need to evaluate it in your directive, you can use the $eval function:

app.directive('yourDirective', function () {
    return {
        restrict: 'A',
        // NB: no isolated scope!!
        link: function (scope, element, attrs) {
            // executes the expression on the current scope returning the result
            // and adds it to the scope
            scope.variable = scope.$eval(attrs.yourDirective);
            console.log(scope.variable);

        },
        // the variable is available in directive controller,
        // and can be fetched as done in link function
        controller: ['$scope', '$element', '$attrs',
            function ($scope, $element, $attrs) {
                // executes the expression on the current scope returning the result
                // and adds it to the scope
                scope.variable = scope.$eval($attrs.yourDirective);
                console.log($scope.variable);
            }
         ]
    };
})
.controller('MyCtrl', ['$scope', function ($scope) {
    // variable passed to app controller
    $scope.$watch('variable', function (value) {
        if (value) {
            console.log(value);
        }
    });
}]);

And here's the html (remember the brackets!):

<div ng-controller="MyCtrl">
    <div your-directive="{{ someObject.someVariable }}"></div>
    <!-- use ng-bind instead of {{ }}, when you can to avoids FOUC -->
    <div ng-bind="variable"></div>
</div>

Also, have a look at this answer: http://stackoverflow.com/a/12372494/1008519

Reference for FOUC (flash of unstyled content) issue: http://deansofer.com/posts/view/14/AngularJs-Tips-and-Tricks-UPDATED

For the interested: here's an article on the angular life cycle

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