Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When compiling the following code under Xcode 4.5 (Mac), compilation fails with the following error message:

call to 'pow' is ambiguous

Why? Thanks!

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>
#include <limits>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    cout << "\tSquare root calculator using an emulation the ENIAC's algorithm." << endl
         << endl;

    long long m;
    while ((cout << "Enter a positive integer:" << endl)
            && (!(cin >> m) || m < 0 || m > 9999999999)) //10-digit maxium
    {
        cout << "Out of range.";
        cin.clear();
        cin.ignore(std::numeric_limits<std::streamsize>::max(), '\n');
    }

    again:
    long long l = m;

//Find out how big the integer is and adjust k accordingly.
    int order = -1;
    long long temp = m;
    do
    {
        temp /= 10;
        order++;
    } while (temp/10);
    int k = order/2;

//Step 1
    long long a = -1;
    do
    {
        a+=2;
        m -= a*pow(100,k);
    } while (m >= 0);

    while (k > 0)
    {
        k--;

//Step 2
        if (m < 0)
        {
            a = 10*a+9;
            for (;m < 0;a -= 2)
            {
                m += a*pow(100,k);
            }
            a += 2;
        }

//Step 3
        else
        {
            a = 10*a-9;
            for(;m >= 0;a += 2)
            {
                m -= a*pow(100,k);
            }
                 a -= 2;
        }

    }

//Step 4
    cout << endl << "The square root of " << l << " is greater than or equal to "
         << (a-1)/2 << " and less than " << (a+1)/2 << "." << endl << endl;

    while ((cout << "Enter a positive integer to calculate again, or zero to exit." << endl)
            && (!(cin >> m) || m < 0 || m > 9999999999))
    {
        cout << "Out of range.";
        cin.clear();
        cin.ignore(std::numeric_limits<std::streamsize>::max(), '\n');
    }


    if (m > 0) goto again;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
2  
There's no pow(int, int) overload. Make one of the arguments a floating-point. –  chris Nov 10 '12 at 3:37
1  
As a side note, 9999999999 cannot fit into a long on 32-bit systems. Consider writing it 9999999999LL. –  Bill Nov 10 '12 at 3:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As you can see here there is no pow(int,int);

pow
    <cmath>
         double pow (      double base,      double exponent );
    long double pow ( long double base, long double exponent );
          float pow (       float base,       float exponent );
         double pow (      double base,         int exponent );
    long double pow ( long double base,         int exponent );
share|improve this answer

This link looks like it answers your question: http://bytes.com/topic/c/answers/727736-ambiguous-call-pow

It looks like the pow() function doesn't like integers.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.