Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I just wrote a pretty simple input validation algorithm. I thought it was pretty good, but when I was testing it I saw something I didn't understand. Here is the code first.

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <sstream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
cout << "Simple Menu"
    << "\n\t\t1. Input"
    << "\n\t\t2. Exit" << endl;

string input = "";

int myNum = 0;

char myChar = {0};

do
{
    cout << "Please enter a valid menu option: ";
    getline(cin,input);

    if (!(stringstream(input) >> myNum))
    {
        cout << "Please enter a valid menu option: ";
        getline(cin,input);
    }           

}while(myNum < 1 || myNum > 5 || input.length() != 1);

cout << "\nThe menu option you entered is: " << myNum << endl << endl;

return 0;       
}

Turns out, if I put .1 in as a choice it asks me to enter a valid option, which is good. However, if I enter 2 (a valid option) immediately following entering .1, it still reacts as though I put in a bad value. Here is the console window for such an event:

Simple Menu
                1. Input
                2. Exit
Please enter a valid menu option: .1
Please enter a valid menu option: 2
Please enter a valid menu option: 2

The menu option you entered is: 2

Press any key to continue . . .

Any idea why this is?

share|improve this question
    
p.s. I know the myChar doesn't have to be there, I forgot to delete it from the code after I was done messing around. – Dustin Burns Nov 10 '12 at 4:09
1  
Follow the execution path. When you enter 2 the first time, it's in the if block, and there's no conversion in there. – chris Nov 10 '12 at 4:12
1  
By the way, that will accept 2ab as input. I prefer boost::lexical_cast. – chris Nov 10 '12 at 4:14
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your current code:

do
{
    cout << "Please enter a valid menu option: ";    // first prompt
    getline(cin,input);                              // you enter .1

    if (!(stringstream(input) >> myNum))
    {
        cout << "Please enter a valid menu option: ";// second prompt
        getline(cin,input);                          // this data is discarded
    }           

}while(myNum < 1 || myNum > 5 || input.length() != 1);

Change to:

do
{
    cout << "Please enter a valid menu option: "; // first prompt
    getline(cin,input);                           // .1

    if (!(stringstream(input) >> myNum)) continue;// if parsing fails loop back
} while(myNum < 1 || myNum > 5 || input.length() != 1);

Simplify further to:

myNum = -1;
do
{
    cout << "Please enter a valid menu option: "; // first prompt
    getline(cin,input);                           // .1

    stringstream(input) >> myNum;
} while(myNum < 1 || myNum > 5);
share|improve this answer
1  
You could make it even simpler by giving myNum a default (and invalid) value, like -1, and getting rid of the check inside the loop (since the loop will keep on going until you enter a valid value anyway). – Wug Nov 10 '12 at 4:32
    
I didn't know there was such a thing as continue! That'll really come in handy. Also, your logic on the second version is really good, thanks! – Dustin Burns Nov 10 '12 at 5:21

Trace out your logic, its doing what you told it todo. What you want is something like so

string input;
int myNum = -1;
while(myNum < 1 || myNum > 5 || input.length != 1){
    cout << "Please pick a valid menu options: ";
    getline(cin,input);
    stringstream parser(input);
    if(! (parser >> input )){
       input.clear();
       myNum = -1;
    }  
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.