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Just a disclaimer up front: this is a homework assignment; I come here because my (online) teach isn't terribly responsive. That said, I think I have it all figured out except for one issue.

The assignment is to time how long it takes to create 1000 each of 3 arrays of 100000 size in different ways: Static, on the Stack, and on the Heap. I'm pretty sure I have the code right for creating the arrays. The problem I am running into is when I print avgTime to the screen, each function outputs the exact same value. So if the first function took 800ms, that time will just be repeated over for the next two functions. I think it has something to do with the scope of the avgTime variable. Any thoughts?

#include <iostream>
#include <windows.h>

using namespace std;

void fStaticArray() {
   int i = 0;
   DWORD avgTime;
   while (i<1000){
      DWORD before = GetTickCount();
      static int staticArray [100000];
      i++;
      DWORD after = GetTickCount();
      avgTime = avgTime + (after - before);
   }
   cout << "fStaticArray: " << (avgTime/1000) << "ms  ";
   //avgTime = 0;
}

void fStackArray() {
   int i = 0;
   DWORD avgTime;
   while (i < 1000) {
      DWORD before = GetTickCount();
      int stackArray [100000];
      i++;
      DWORD after = GetTickCount();
      avgTime = avgTime + (after - before);
   }
   cout << "fStackArray: " << (avgTime/1000) << "ms   ";
}

void fHeapArray() {
   int i = 0;
   DWORD avgTime;
   while (i < 1000) {
     DWORD before = GetTickCount();
     int * heapArray = new int[100000];
     i++;
     DWORD after = GetTickCount();
     avgTime = avgTime + (after - before);
   }
   cout << "fHeapArray: " << (avgTime/1000) << "ms   ";
}


int main(void) {
   fStaticArray();
   fStackArray();
   fHeapArray();
}
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4  
What happens when you initialise avgTime to 0 in each function? You are currently working with an uninitialised value. –  Tim Nov 10 '12 at 4:25
    
In addition to the above, are you sure they aren't all taking the same time? Clocks aren't generally very granular on a lot of systems so you may be running into trouble there. Odds are it's a failure to initialize combined with a very small time differential. –  Chris Hayes Nov 10 '12 at 4:26
    
i just ran your code and got 3 different values for the times ? –  Illusionist Nov 10 '12 at 4:26
    
Tim is correct. Weather or not a value is initialized to 0 in C++ is up to the implementation, but is certainly not guaranteed. –  Ogre Psalm33 Nov 10 '12 at 4:29
    
Note that your third approach is leaking memory, if you new [] you must delete []. @OgrePsalm33: The standard does not guarantee initialization and the intention is that no initialization will be performed, the values in the array are uninitialized in all the three cases. To initialize them you can use aggregate-initialization in the first two cases or new int[100000](); for dynamic memory. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 10 '12 at 4:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is no scope problem. Two things could make output same. First, they are same value. If they are and you are not convinced try putting different sleep in all loops or make them run for different numbers and you will see they print different. Second, they may be different, but as division of two int is int so they are printing same value. Try least one argument of division to float. Before going with any of two just try printing avgValue without division. Also you may want to put GetTickCount() before and after the while loop.

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Vishal, that was the trick. I put getch() in between the function calls to slow things down a bit and it worked like a charm. Thanks! –  ramathews Nov 10 '12 at 4:42
    
Now you are convinced there is no global scope problem, remove getch() and report what you observed. Modern compiler and machine are fast enough and creating million ints does not seems to be time consuming. If you still want to report some difference try playing with creation of larger objects (define a class with lots of data member of big arrays) and hope to get difference. –  Vishal Kumar Nov 10 '12 at 4:49
    
It gave me the same report as made me think there was a problem in the first place. All three have the same numbers. I am interested in pursuing this as it is super interesting to me but my next project awaits... thanks again for your help! –  ramathews Nov 10 '12 at 8:27

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