Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a quick question: I do alot of iteration of Dictionary.Value collections and in annoys me that I have to call .ToList() to then be able to call .ForEach(), as it seems none of the enumerable collections in a Dictionary (The Dictionary itself, the Keys collection or the Values collection) have a ForEach extension method.

Is there any good reason why the ForEach() extension method has not been implemented on these collections, or is it just something that MS felt was not important?

Is it that unusual to iterate over Dictionary collections? I often use Dictionaries rather than Lists when storing data pulled out of Databases, using the records Identity value as the Key. I have to admit alot of the time I don't even lookup by the Id key, but it is just a habit I have gotten into...

share|improve this question
1  
why don't you just write an extension yourself? – Darko Z Aug 26 '09 at 1:39
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Eric Lippert explains why Microsoft didn't write a ForEach extension method.

You can write one yourself:

public static void ForEach<T>(this IEnumerable<T> sequence, Action<T> action) {
    if (sequence == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("sequence");
    if (action == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("action");
    foreach(T item in sequence) 
        action(item);
}

//Return false to stop the loop
public static void ForEach<T>(this IEnumerable<T> sequence, Func<T, bool> action) {
    if (sequence == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("sequence");
    if (action == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("action");

    foreach(T item in sequence) 
        if (!action(item))
            return;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Eric's article makes some good points. I hope people read that before they go too crazy using your answer. – patridge Mar 11 '10 at 21:59
    
Eric makes a good argument against a general ForEach on IEnumerable<>, but for Dictionary<> it would still be advantageous, because the plain foreach loop gives you a KeyValuePair, but a lambda could have two arguments, one for the key and one for the value, which would make the code look cleaner. – gpvos Jul 9 '14 at 15:07

There is no good reason (IMO) for there not to have been a ForEach extension method implemented on IEnumerable<T> (instead it is only on List<T>). I have created a ForEach extension method in my common libraries, it's only a few lines of code.

public static void ForEach<T>( this IEnumerable<T> list, Action<T> action ) {
    foreach( var o in list ) {
        action( o );
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Hmm, let's upgrade my comment to an answer, so I can include readable code.

Eric makes a good argument against a general ForEach on IEnumerable<>, but for Dictionary<> it would still be advantageous, because the plain foreach loop gives you a KeyValuePair, but a lambda could have two arguments, one for the key and one for the value, which would make the code look cleaner.

public static void ForEach<TKey, TValue>(this Dictionary<TKey, TValue> dict, Action<TKey, TValue> action) {
    if (dict == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("dict");
    if (action == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("action");

    foreach (KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue> item in dict) {
        action(item.Key, item.Value);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.