Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
is f(void) deprecated in modern C and C++

Ok, so I have heard different opinions on this subject and just want to make sure I understand it correctly.

For C++

Declarations void f(); and void f(void); mean precisely the same thing, the function f does not take any parameters. Ditto for definitions.

For C

Declaration void f(void); means that f does not take any parameters.

Declaration void f(); means that function f may or may not have parameters, and if it does, we don't know what kind of parameters those are, or how many there is of them. Note that it is NOT the same as ellipsis, we can't use va_list.

Now here is where things get interesting.

Case 1

Declaration:

void f();

Definition:

void f(int a, int b, float c)
{
   //...
}

Case 2

Declaration:

void f();

Definition:

void f()
{
   //...
}

Question:

What happens at compile time in cases 1 and 2 when we call f with the correct arguments, wrong arguments and no arguments at all? What happens at run time?

Additional question:

If I declare f with arguments, but define it without them, will it make a difference? Should I be able to address the arguments from the function body?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Bo Persson, BЈовић, iny, Kjuly, j0k Nov 10 '12 at 12:18

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
in C void f(); is the same as void f(void);. In one you are implicitly saying "no arguments" (the compiler infers this) and in the other one you are explicitly saying "no arguments". Also it is better if you try those examples on your own, so you get more comfortable while using the compiler later on. –  Kira Nov 10 '12 at 5:30
15  
@Kira: WRONG. In C, void f(); means "unspecified arguments". This is a holdover from pre-ANSI C, and it is included in ANSI C for compatibility with K&R era C. –  Dietrich Epp Nov 10 '12 at 5:34
4  
Not so, Kira. If the declarator is part of the definition of the function, you're right - it has no parameters. However, if the declarator does not define the function (i.e. a prototype only), it simply means no info is yet available. See 6.7.6.3 /14 of C11. –  paxdiablo Nov 10 '12 at 5:39
    
@Dietrich (this is something I did not know till now, thanks) but as paxdiablo pointed out this only occurs when declaring, I meant when defining a function . Oh well, pastebin.com/MqhDBZg1 this link a program someone can try to make sense out of this (as I did :)) –  Kira Nov 10 '12 at 5:49
    
wow what a great thread. –  sandun dhammika Nov 10 '12 at 11:28

5 Answers 5

up vote 34 down vote accepted

More terminology (C, not C++): a prototype for a function declares the types of its arguments. Otherwise the function does not have a prototype.

void f();                      // Declaration, but not a prototype
void f(void);                  // Declaration and prototype
void f(int a, int b, float c); // Declaration and protoype

Declarations that aren't prototypes are holdovers from pre-ANSI C, from the days of K&R C. The only reason to use an old-style declaration is to maintain binary compatibility with old code. For example, in Gtk 2 there is a function declaration without a prototype -- it is there by accident, but it can't be removed without breaking binaries. The C99 standard comments:

6.11.6 Function declarators

The use of function declarators with empty parentheses (not prototype-format parameter type declarators) is an obsolescent feature.

Recommendation: I suggest compiling all C code in GCC/Clang with -Wstrict-prototypes and -Wmissing-prototypes, in addition to the usual -Wall -Wextra.

What happens

void f(); // declaration
void f(int a, int b, float c) { } // ERROR

The declaration disagrees with the function body! This is actually a compile time error, and it's because you can't have a float argument in a function without a prototype. The reason you can't use a float in an unprototyped function is because when you call such a function, all of the arguments get promoted using certain default promotions. Here's a fixed example:

void f();

void g()
{
    char a;
    int b;
    float c;
    f(a, b, c);
}

In this program, a is promoted to int1 and c is promoted to double. So the definition for f() has to be:

void f(int a, int b, double c)
{
    ...
}

See C99 6.7.6 paragraph 15,

If one type has a parameter type list and the other type is specified by a function declarator that is not part of a function definition and that contains an empty identifier list, the parameter list shall not have an ellipsis terminator and the type of each parameter shall be compatible with the type that results from the application of the default argument promotions.

Answer 1

What happens at compile time in cases 1 and 2 when we call f with the correct arguments, wrong arguments and no arguments at all? What happens at run time?

When you call f(), the parameters get promoted using the default promotions. If the promoted types match the actual parameter types for f(), then all is good. If they don't match, it will probably compile but you will definitely get undefined behavior.

"Undefined behavior" is spec-speak for "we make no guarantees about what will happen." Maybe your program will crash, maybe it will work fine, maybe it will invite your in-laws over for dinner.

There are two ways to get diagnostics at compile-time. If you have a sophisticated compiler with cross-module static analysis capabilities, then you will probably get an error message. You can also get messages for un-prototyped function declarations with GCC, using -Wstrict-prototypes -- which I recommend turning on in all your projects (except for files which use Gtk 2).

Answer 2

If I declare f with arguments, but define it without them, will it make a difference? Should I be able to address the arguments from the function body?

It shouldn't compile.

Exceptions

There are actually two cases in which function arguments are allowed to disagree with the function definition.

  1. It is okay to pass char * to a function that expects void *, and vice versa.

  2. It is okay to pass a signed integer type to a function that expects the unsigned version of that type, or vice versa, as long as the value is representable in both types (i.e., it is not negative, and not out of range of the signed type).

Footnotes

1: It is possible that char promotes to unsigned int, but this is very uncommon.

share|improve this answer
    
"What happens" is dead wrong - you do NOT get an error, not should you. –  paxdiablo Nov 10 '12 at 5:41
    
@paxdiablo: But I do get an error. GCC: error: conflicting types for ‘f’; note: an argument type that has a default promotion can’t match an empty parameter name list declaration. –  Dietrich Epp Nov 10 '12 at 5:42
    
@paxdiablo: Error occurs in GCC 4.0, 4.2, and 4.7, as well as Clang 3.1. –  Dietrich Epp Nov 10 '12 at 5:44
1  
You should read the error more closely. It has nothing to do with the empty list per se. It's to do with your chosen arguments (the float). It disallows arguments with a default promotion (float->double). You'll find that if you change that float to an int or double, your error disappears. –  paxdiablo Nov 10 '12 at 5:53
1  
@paxdiablo: I'm sorry, I thought that was exactly what I was saying. Look at the second example, which changes the type to double. –  Dietrich Epp Nov 10 '12 at 5:57

C11 section 6.7.6.3 Function declarators /14 covers this:

An empty list in a function declarator that is part of a definition of that function specifies that the function has no parameters. The empty list in a function declarator that is not part of a definition of that function specifies that no information about the number or types of the parameters is supplied.

Basically what that means is that if you supply no parameters while defining the function such as with int f() { return 7; }, it's the same as if you said int f(void) { return 7; }.

However, if you do that _without defining the function, such as int f();, the information is not yet available.

So:

int f();
int f(int a) { return a; }

is not an error.

You can see this in the following transcript:

pax> cat qq.c
    #include <stdio.h>
    #include <stdlib.h>
    int f();
    int f(int x) {
        return x;
    }
    int main (int argc, char *argv[]) {
         printf ("%d\n", f(atoi(argv[1])));
         return 0;
    }

pax> gcc -Wall --std=c99 -o qq qq.c
pax> ./qq 42
42
share|improve this answer

In C++, f() and f(void) is same

In C, they are different and any number of arguments can be passed while calling f() function but no argument can be passed in f(void)

share|improve this answer

For C++ f() and f(void) mean the same - the function not taking any parameters.

For C, f(void) means the function not taking any parameters, but f() means function taking unspecified number of parameters - that means (see example below) that caller code can pass to function whatever it wants - but function takes a strict arguments - so it is a very weak method of declaring functions - but at K&R era it was the only method.

The example shows this C f() in practice and its consequences:

#include <stdio.h>

void f();

int main() {
  f(); /* prints some garbage */
  f(16);  /* prints 16 */
  f(17,0); /* prints 17 */ 
  return 0;
}

void f(a1)
  int a1;
{
   printf("%d\n", a1);
}
share|improve this answer

In pure C, this results in the error: error C2084: function 'void __cdecl f(void )' already has a body

void f(void);
void f( );

int main() {
  f(10);
  f(10.10);
  f("ten");

  return 0;
}

void f(void) {

}

void f( ) {

}

.

 fvoid.c line(19) : error C2084: function 'void __cdecl f(void )' already has a body

But in Pure C++, it will compile without errors.

Overloading functions (C++ only, C has no overloading)

You overload a function name f by declaring more than one function with the name f in the same scope. The declarations of f must differ from each other by the types and/or the number of arguments in the argument list. When you call an overloaded function named f, the correct function is selected by comparing the argument list of the function call with the parameter list of each of the overloaded candidate functions with the name f.

example:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

void f(int i);
void f(double  f);
void f(char* c);


int main() {
  f(10);
  f(10.10);
  f("ten");

  return 0;
}

void f(int i) {
  cout << " Here is int " << i << endl;
}
void f(double  f) {
  cout << " Here is float " << f << endl;
}

void f(char* c) {
  cout << " Here is char* " << c << endl;
}

output:

 Here is int 10
 Here is float 10.1
 Here is char* ten
share|improve this answer
1  
So... what does this have to do with the difference between void f(); and void f(void); ? –  Dietrich Epp Nov 10 '12 at 6:11
    
void f(void) is the correct way to say "no parameters" in C. But void f( ) will do just as fine –  Software_Developer Nov 10 '12 at 6:16
1  
This question is mostly about C, is it not? C has no overloading. –  GManNickG Nov 10 '12 at 6:23
    
"But void f( ) will do just as fine.": no, not in C. –  Mat Nov 10 '12 at 8:55
    
the difference between void f(); and void f(void) -> In pure C, this results in the error: error C2084: function 'void __cdecl f(void )' already has a body. In C++, it's just function overloading. –  Software_Developer Nov 10 '12 at 12:12

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.