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I declared two functions using function expression innerone and innertwo. I first declared innerone and after that innertwo. Inside innerone I am calling innertwo function. But my concern is that I am declaring innertwo after innerone using function expression which means innertwo is not hoisted. So why these functions work in this order? Is it mandatory to change their order?

Here is code

var one = function () {
    var innerone = function () {
        innertwo();
    },

    innertwo = function () {
        console.log('innertwo');
    };

    return {
        innerone: innerone
    };
};

var o = new one();
o.innerone();
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3  
It works because you are calling innertwo after it was defined (when you call innerone). If you'd directly place a call to innertwo before var innertwo = function() .... it would throw an error. –  Felix Kling Nov 10 '12 at 8:36
    
It works because when you create a new instance of the object and innerone is returned innertwo already exists. But I don't think you should be using new since it seems you're using the module pattern, just use var o = one(). –  elclanrs Nov 10 '12 at 8:38
    
Why do this in the first place? There are much clearer ways to end up with the same result. –  jfriend00 Nov 10 '12 at 8:52
    
@jfriend00 for example which ways? –  2619 Nov 10 '12 at 8:53
    
@x4f4r - simpler ways provided in an answer below. –  jfriend00 Nov 10 '12 at 9:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It's working because innerone is called only when you call it. And by the time it's called innertwo is defined.

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You asked in your comment for simpler ways to write this code, so here are a couple simpler ways. The first still returns the structure and can be just called as a function without new. The second adds a property to the function object, but still preserves the private function innertwo(). The second option looks the cleanest to me.

Option 1:

function one() {
    function innertwo() {
        console.log('innertwo');
    }

    return {
        innerone: function() {
            innertwo();
        }
    };
}

var o = one();    // new is not needed here
o.innerone();

Option 2:

function one() {
    function innertwo() {
        console.log('innertwo');
    }

    this.innerone = function () {
        innertwo();
    };
};


var o = new one();
o.innerone();
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