Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Below is a minimized example, where I have OA.pm (the parent object), OB.pm the child object, and the runner script:

Object OB:

package OB;

use OA;
require Exporter;
@ISA = (Exporter, OA);
@EXPORT = ();

sub new {
    my $class = shift;

    print $class->SUPER;
    bless {}, $class;
};

1;

Object OA:

package OA;

require Exporter;
@ISA = (Exporter);
@EXPORT = ();

sub new {
    bless {}, shift;
};

1;

And the runner:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use OB;

print OB->new;

When I run it, I got:

Can't locate object method "SUPER" via package "OB" at OB.pm line 10.

1) What could be wrong?

2) And what would the SUPER points to if I have more than one parent?

3) Was use OA mandatory?

share|improve this question
    
Note that you don't need to inherit from Exporter. You just need use Exporter qw( import ); –  ikegami Nov 10 '12 at 10:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Unlike in Ruby, you must explicitly spell out the whole method you're referring to.

print $class->SUPER::new;

That is assuming you wanted to call the method. If your intent is to figure out what parent class contains the new method, that's complicated and I'm going to skip explaining how here.

If your class has more than one parent, multiple inheritance, Perl normally looks through the parents depth first for a matching method. This is often problematic, and you can switch to the C3 method resolution order (mro) with use mro "c3" which avoids the diamond inheritance problem.

More information on how SUPER and multiple inheritance.

Finally, use OA or require OA was mandatory in order to load the OA class. You can load and inherit from a class in one line using use parent "OA".

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, I just updated my question, I split it to three parts, can you check it? (The second and the third one) –  warl0ck Nov 10 '12 at 8:46
    
Got it and updated. What did you intend to get from print $class->SUPER? –  Schwern Nov 10 '12 at 8:54
    
Nothing, I was trying to create a really minimized example ... since perl normally just print an memory address of it, just to see if it works –  warl0ck Nov 10 '12 at 8:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.