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I have two methods: a() and b(). While I'm fine with multiple threads accessing any of the methods at the same time (that is desirable), I do not want any threads to enter a() while b() is being executed. How do I do that?

Edit 1

Lets say there are 4 threads and Thread 1 is accessing A(). What I want is all of the 4 threads should not use B().

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1  
call b() at the end of a() –  Fahim Parkar Nov 10 '12 at 9:14
    
I don't think that's what is being asked. –  assylias Nov 10 '12 at 9:22
1  
Threads are not allowed to executed a() while b() is being used. Does b() modify the underlying resource? Are you looking for a ReadWriteLock? –  coding.mof Nov 10 '12 at 9:22
    
I do not want any threads to enter a() while b() is being executed means if Thread A is accessing a() then you don't want Thread B to use b()? Is that what you want? If yes, please tell us what exactly you are trying to do. Maybe we can help you. I smell, something fishy is going on in your code –  Fahim Parkar Nov 10 '12 at 9:26
1  
And what about when while a() is being executed? Is any other thread allowed to enter b()? –  MD.Unicorn Nov 10 '12 at 9:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

CHECK UPDATE at the bottom - I don't think this approach can work. Leaving it for information.


You could use a Semaphore:

  • if a thread is in b(), a thread trying to execute a() will block until the execution of b() is over.
  • if a thread is in b() and a second thread tries to run b() it will be able to
  • if 2 threads execute a() while b() is not being executed both will run

Note: once a thread is in a() and has passed the "semaphore test", another thread can start running b() before the end of a()

The principle should work but I have not tested it.

private final Semaphore inB = new Semaphore(1);

public void a() throws InterruptedException {
    inB.acquire(); //blocks until no thread is in b any longer
    //now we are good to go and execute a()
    //release the semaphore immediately for other threads who want to run a()
    inB.release(); 
    //rest of your code here
}
public void b() {
    //does not block to allow 2 thread running b() simultaneously
    boolean needToRelease = inB.tryAcquire(); 
    //rest of your code
    //if the permit was acquired, release it to allow threads to run a()
    if (needToRelease) {
        inB.release();
    }
}

EDIT

Your intention is not clear and your question has been edited because one of your comments says that you want a() and b() to be mutually exclusive (many threads can run either a() or b() in parallel, but a() and b() should never be run in parallel). In that case, you can use the same logic with 2 semaphores inA and inB.


UPDATE => BUG

As pointed out by @yshavit in a comment to another answer, there is a race condition in the code in the following scenario:

  • T1 runs a() and acquires inB
  • T2 runs b() and fails to acquire inB
  • T1 releases inB
  • T3 runs a() and manages to acquire inB although T2 is running b()

It seems that this can't be achieved with Sempahores only. This answer gives a better solution.

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could you please see reply to my comment? I don't understand what OP is trying to do. if Thread A is accessing a() then OP don't want Thread B to use b() –  Fahim Parkar Nov 10 '12 at 9:43
    
What if the first thread passes a()'s semaphore lock and unlock. Context switch. Thread 2 jumps into b(). It starts executing b(). Context switch A() gets executed. Isn't this exactly the case we want to avoid? That a and b are executed in parallel? –  coding.mof Nov 10 '12 at 9:44
    
@coding.mof I included that case in my answer. The original question states: "I do not want any threads to enter a() while b() is being executed". So once you have entered a() because no thread was running b(), you are fine. –  assylias Nov 10 '12 at 9:47

Exception handling ommitted for simplicity:

public class Test {
  private final Object lock = new Object();
  private int counterA;
  private int counterB;

  public void a() {
    synchronized(lock) {
      while(counterB > 0) {
        lock.wait();
      }
      ++counterA;
    }

    // do work

    synchronized(lock) {
      --counterA;
      lock.notifyAll();
    }
  }

  public void b() {
    synchronized(lock) {
      while(counterA > 0) {
        lock.wait();
      }
      ++counterB;
    }

    // do work

    synchronized(lock) {
      --counterB;
      lock.notifyAll();
    }
  }
}
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This one is also correct I think. –  milan Nov 10 '12 at 10:19

java.util.concurrent.locks is a Java package which contains several locks

in a(), take a lock and release it at the end of a()

in b(), do the same with the same lock

If you want to deal with asymmetric behavior you may use a ReadWriteLock, a() is reader and b() is writer : several b() locks but several a() doesn't.

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1  
that is what synchronize will do and that is not what OP is looking for –  Fahim Parkar Nov 10 '12 at 9:28
    
Answer edited . –  Aubin Nov 10 '12 at 9:33

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