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I'm playing a little bit with some C# Winforms/WPF code and just stumbled upon something strange. Let's say I have a code like this:

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        DoSomething();

        // maybe something more if everything went ok
    }
}

What puzzles me is that I cannot simply close the application from the method DoSomething before the constructor finishes its job. If anything during the execution of DoSomething fails, I need to close the application immediately, but it just keeps running, executes the part // maybe something more... and THEN closes, but that's way too late for me.

I have to put the code for closing the form inside the constructor itself with a following return; and then it works, but I don't really find that an acceptable solution. I'm trying to move such validation logic from the constructor to my methods.

I tried things like

public void DoSomething()
{
    Close();
}

or

public void DoSomething()
{
    Application.Current.Shutdown();
}

But it doesn't seem to work. Yes, both codes do close the application, but only after a fully finished constructor code.

Why would I need such a thing? Well, because at startup I need to check for various things, like availability of the connection and hardware, validate the user etc, and if anything fails, there's no point of executing more code.

Tried the same principle with Winforms and WPF (hence the tags), works the same.

Can anybody provide an explanation or maybe a solution? I know this is probably very basic to some of you, but please, bare with me, I'm not primarily a Windows programmer, so this is kinda new for me. Websites work a bit differently... :)

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When first form is being created no app is running, so Shutdown() is probably ignored. Avip offered good solution. –  voroninp Nov 10 '12 at 9:27

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Just try using Environment.Exit(-1) in your situation and all will be good.

ADDED: This is the best reference i can get for you.

Difference between Application.Exit vs Application.Shutdown vs Environment.Exit

Application.Exit() is for exiting a windows forms application in a graceful way. Basically, it stops the message pump, closes all windows and lands you back in the Main() method just after the call to Application.Run(). However, sometimes it doesn't appear to work - this is usually because there are other foreground threads (apart from the UI thread) still running which are preventing the thread from ending.

Application.Shutdown() is (broadly) the equivalent of Application.Exit() in a WPF application. However, you have a bit more control as you can set the ShutDownMode so that the application shuts down when the main window closes, the last window closes or only when this method is called.

Environment.Exit() kills all running threads and the process itself stone dead. This should only be used in WF or WPF as a last resort when the more graceful methods are not working for some reason. It can also be used to make an abrupt exit from a console application.

Another Reference: How to properly exit a c# application?

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Thanks, this seems to behave as expected. Can you explain, why it doesn't work with Shutdown() or Close()? Are there any pitfalls to look for with your solution? –  walther Nov 10 '12 at 10:49
    
There are no pitfalls. Instead Environment.Exit core responsibility is to terminates the process and gives the underlying OS the specified exit code. Reference: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.environment.exit.aspx –  FSX Nov 10 '12 at 11:15
    
Thank you. There are times I don't need to throw exceptions etc, just a simple "quit". :) –  walther Nov 10 '12 at 12:41

You can always ignore your fellow developers and just Environment.FailFast("doh!")

But really - don't. If you have critical things to do, S.A verifying the serial port is connected to the nuclear power plant, just do it prior. There's no rule forcing you to Application.Run(...) as soon as Main() is called.

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Can you please elaborate, why not to do that? The solution from FSX seems to work, are there any potential problems to be aware of with his approach? Application.Run is relevant only to Winforms (or maybe I'm wrong?), but what about WPF? Please, can you show an example in WPF to illustrate your solution, e.g. where would you put the critical boot instructions (checking for opened ports and stuff like that)? Simple example would do. –  walther Nov 10 '12 at 10:46

There have already been posted viable solutions for your problem.

Just to answer your follow-up question: the reason why methods like Close() and Shutdown() do not immediately exit your application is that both just push messages into the application's message queue. They are only processed after MainWindow's constructor finished and code execution returns to the message processing loop, maybe even after some other still pending messages in the queue have been handled too. On the contrary, methods like Environment.Exit() or Environment.FailFast() are kind of hard-core os functions leading to more or less immediately killing the process.

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Thank you for the explanation. Shame I can't select multiple answers. At least +1 for you too :) –  walther Nov 10 '12 at 12:42

Define an Exception class:

public class InitializationException : Exception
{
    public InitializationException()
    {}

    public InitializationException(string msg)
        : base(msg)
    {}

    public InitializationException(string msg, Exception inner)
        : base(msg, inner)
    {}
}

and change your code like this:

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        try
        {
            DoSomething();

            // maybe something more if everything went ok
        }
        catch( InitializationException ex )
        {
            // log the exception
            Close();
        }
    }

    public void DoSomething()
    {
        if (notSomethingOK)
            throw new InitializationException( "Something is not OK and the applicaiton must shutdown." );
    }
}

This is a clean and maintainable solution.

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A workaround would be to throw a exception and handle it in application.UnhandledException

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