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My program crashes because it reaches a stack.top() it shouldn't reach, as the stack is empty. I have an if which checks just that:

    if(!st.empty());
        //do stuff

(I have initialized

stack<int> st;

).

But although I can see in the debug that the stack is empty, it still goes in the if! I even wrote this code:

    if(st.size()>0);
        cout<<st.size();

And it prints 0! What is going on and how can I fix it? Thanks!

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"My program"... what is your program? How are we supposed to tell what's going on if we don't see it? –  Mehrdad Nov 10 '12 at 9:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 17 down vote accepted

The semicolons after the if statements are the problem

BAD:

if(st.size()>0); // <-- this should not be here!!!!!!!!
    cout<<st.size();

Properly rewritten:

if(st.size()>0) {
    cout<<st.size();
}

Also, as @WhozCraig pointed out, the other statement has a semicolon too!

BAD:

if(!st.empty()); // <--BAD!
    //do stuff

Good:

if(!st.empty()) {
    //do stuff
}

ALWAYS!! use brackets with branches (if, switch), and loops (for, while, do-while)!!! It pays off big time! (Not to mention, a cute kitten dies each and every time such a block is written without brackets!) ALWAYS!!

For example this can kill a day in debugging:

BAD:

int i=0;
...
while(i++<1000);
    doStuff(i);

Good:

int i=0;
...
while(i++<1000) {
    doStuff(i);
}

Beware (as @WhozCraig pointed out again) this does not automagically solve the problem of semicolon terminated branch and loop statements, as this is perfectly valid syntax:

if (condition);{ ...code... } 

Or

if (condition);
{ 
     ...code... 
} 

But in my opinion and experience (this is totally subjective!) - as I myself have fallen into this trap a couple of times - I experienced that when I have the curly bracket after the aforementioned statements, I didn't ever make the mistake of typing a semicolon again. Adhering to this convention was a silver bullet - for me, and others could benefit from this too. Also, if there was a semicolon there, it would immediately catch my eye, just by looking, as it is an "uncommon pattern of characters".

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+1 the problem is on both if statements btw (not yours; the original post). –  WhozCraig Nov 10 '12 at 9:42
4  
Fwiw, curly braces are no magic bullet for terminated if-statements, while-statements, or any other block-control construct. if (condition);{ ...code... } is just as valid (and just as broken) as without the curly braces, and depending on the format-choice of the editor, just as hard to spot. –  WhozCraig Nov 10 '12 at 9:58
    
@WhozCraig that is definitely true, but - as I myself have fallen into this trap a couple of times - I have experienced that when I have the curly bracket after the aforementioned statements, I didn't ever make the mistake of typing a semicolon too. So adhering to this convention it was a silver bullet - for me... Didn't fall into the trap ever once since that. Also, if there was a semicolon there, it would immediately catch my eye, just by looking, as it is an "uncommon pattern of characters". (I do include this in the answer too, as it definitely adds to it) –  ppeterka Nov 10 '12 at 10:01
1  
I'd be curious to know how many engineers would catch the semi-colon in JohnB's third example below at first glance. crowd that line with extra comments (which belong above the if(), pet peeve of mine) and I bet that number climbs markedly. But it works for you, and so long as the engineer finds something that assists in reducing that chance, so much the better. –  WhozCraig Nov 10 '12 at 10:08
    
@WhozCraig this is one cause I started using less comments in my code. I used to be a verbose commenter, aiming to have around 50% of comments in the projects for my own pet projects, but after reading Clean Code, and after having got angry maintaining that amount of non-syntax checked comments, and being mislead by my own (stale) comments, I realized this has got to end... –  ppeterka Nov 10 '12 at 10:11

There is no "in the if", as your if contains only an empty statement:

if(!st.empty());
        //do stuff -- that's outside the if!!!!

(Background: The syntax is if (condition) block, with block being either a statement or a block of statements. ; is an empty statement, so if (...) ; means "if condition fulfilled then do nothing" -- which probably never is what you have in mind.)

You should write

if(!st.empty()) {
        //do stuff -- now it's inside!
}

Be careful! Do NOT write

if(!st.empty()); // notice the semicolon making it wrong; without the semicolon it would be ok
{
        // outside again
}
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1  
Note: good compilers should catch that one, provided you activate the proper warnings, such as -Wempty-body for Clang: warning: if statement has empty body [-Wempty-body]. –  Matthieu M. Nov 10 '12 at 15:39

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