Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

As mentioned in another question on this site, something like this is not legal:

public enum MyEnum {
    FOO {
        public Integer doSomething() { return (Integer) super.doSomething(); }
    },
    BAR {
        public String doSomething() { return (String) super.doSomething(); }
    };

    public Object doSomething();
}

This is due to covariant return types apparently not working on enum constants (again breaking the illusion that enum constants are singleton subclasses of the enum type...) So, how about we add a bit of generics: is this legal?

public enum MyEnum2 {
    FOO {
        public Class<Integer> doSomething() { return Integer.class; }
    },
    BAR {
        public Class<String> doSomething() { return String.class; }
    };

    public Class<?> doSomething();
}

Here, all three return Class objects, yet the individual constants are "more specific" than the enum type as a whole...

share|improve this question
1  
Um, the first code works for me... what error are you seeing? –  Jon Skeet Nov 10 '12 at 10:26
    
Not legal, as in it would compile (glossing over MyEnum's own doSomething() implementation), but not do anything useful, as an expression like MyEnum.FOO.doSomething() would still be considered to return Object and not Integer as people may think. –  Kelvin Chung Nov 10 '12 at 10:28
    
No, it doesn't compile: doSomething has no body and it's not abstract –  Aubin Nov 10 '12 at 10:28
    
@Aubin: Yes, sorry - I'd assumed that bit would be filled in, and it's the first part which isn't legal. –  Jon Skeet Nov 10 '12 at 10:29
1  
There is no breaking of illusion here... the behavior you encounter is exactly the same as with any other anonymous class instance. –  Marko Topolnik Nov 10 '12 at 11:17
show 3 more comments

3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Fundamentally, the problem is that the compile-time type of MyEnum.FOO is MyEnum, not the specific generated subclass. You can see this without any covariance:

enum MyEnum {
    FOO {
        public void foo() {}
    };
}

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception
    {
        MyEnum.FOO.foo(); // Error
    }
}

Basically, the compiler will only see the signatures declared in MyEnum.

share|improve this answer
    
What is the relationship with the question? –  Aubin Nov 10 '12 at 10:34
    
So in the case of the second enum (with the different types as type parameters and the declaration in the enum type itself being a wildcard), you'd still get a Class<?> and not anything specific even with a MyEnum2.FOO.doSomething() call? –  Kelvin Chung Nov 10 '12 at 10:38
2  
@Aubin: It's exactly the same problem: the OP wasn't to know about the value-specific signatures, and they're not available because the compiler only sees MyEnum.FOO as being of type MyEnum. –  Jon Skeet Nov 10 '12 at 10:47
    
@KelvinChung: Exactly - the compiler will only care about the signatures declared in MyEnum. –  Jon Skeet Nov 10 '12 at 10:48
add comment

We can use Covariant return types in Java enums, but we can't use that child type for the variable to which the return is assigned to unlike in normal class hierarchy.

public class EnumCovariance {

   public static void main(String[] args) {
      // Type mismatch: cannot convert from Class<capture#1-of ?> to Class<Integer>
      Class<Integer> something = MyEnum2.FOO.doSomething();
      Child child = new Child();
      Base base = child;
      // ok
      Class<Integer> something3 = child.doSomething();

      // Type mismatch: cannot convert from Class<capture#2-of ?> to Class<Integer>
      Class<Integer> something2 = base.doSomething();
    }
}

abstract class Base {
   public abstract Class<?> doSomething();
}

class Child extends Base {
   @Override
   public Class<Integer> doSomething() {
      return Integer.class;
   }
}

enum MyEnum2 {
   FOO {
      public Class<Integer> doSomething() {
         return Integer.class;
      }
   },
   BAR {
      public Class<String> doSomething() {
         return String.class;
      }
   };

   public abstract Class<?> doSomething();
}
share|improve this answer
    
It does make the whole point of adding in a call super to implement a covariant return type somewhat useless, though... oh well... –  Kelvin Chung Nov 10 '12 at 10:53
    
@KelvinChung, what is the replacement for "MyEnum2.FOO.doSomething()"? –  lab bhattacharjee Nov 10 '12 at 10:57
    
I meant that in the sense that it wouldn't matter whether MyEnum2.FOO.doSomething() returned a Class<Integer> or a Class<?> (beyond a sanity check, I suppose) - the compiler just sees the latter and pretty much ignores the former, methinks. –  Kelvin Chung Nov 10 '12 at 10:59
    
@KelvinChung, then what is the motivation of changing the return type in the implementation in the child class as we can always return Integer.class by keeping the return type Class<?> –  lab bhattacharjee Nov 10 '12 at 11:03
    
My original question was motivated by the fact that, if you were to take enum constants as singleton subclasses of the enum type, that an expression like MyEnum2.FOO would refer specifically to an object of that subclass (which, as we learned, is not the case), and hence, we could make the return type of MyEnum2.FOO.doSomething() more specific than myEnum2Instance.doSomething(), even if it means inserting call supers to do so. –  Kelvin Chung Nov 10 '12 at 11:07
add comment

This code works well:

public enum MyEnum {
   FOO {
      @Override
      public Integer doSomething() {
         return (Integer)super.doSomething();
      }
   },
   BAR {
      @Override
      public String doSomething() {
         return (String)super.doSomething();
      }
   };

   public Object doSomething() {
      System.err.println( this );
      return null;
   }

   public static void main( String[] args ) {
      MyEnum toto = MyEnum.FOO;
      System.err.println( toto.doSomething() );
   }
}

output is:

FOO
null

this code doesn't compile, the error is "The return type is incompatible with MyEnum2.doSomething()", Cannot cast from Class<Object> to Class<Integer> and Cannot cast from Class<Object> to Class<String>:

public enum MyEnum2 {
   FOO {
      @Override
      public Class<Integer> doSomething() {
         return (Class<Integer>)super.doSomething();
      }
   },
   BAR {
      @Override
      public Class<String> doSomething() {
         return (Class<String>)super.doSomething();
      }
   };

   public Class<Object> doSomething() {
      System.err.println( this );
      return null;
   }

   public static void main( String[] args ) {
      MyEnum2 toto = MyEnum2.FOO;
      System.err.println( toto.doSomething() );
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
A Class<String> is not considered assignable to a Class<Object>. MyEnum2.doSomething() must return a Class<?>, as stated in the question. –  Kelvin Chung Nov 10 '12 at 10:43
    
Only null is compatible with type String and type Integer. –  Aubin Nov 10 '12 at 10:46
    
But last time I checked, you can't cast a Class<Object> to a Class<String>, which is what the compiler is barfing about in your MyEnum2. –  Kelvin Chung Nov 10 '12 at 10:50
    
Yes, the compiler message is clear. –  Aubin Nov 10 '12 at 10:51
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.