Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

we have been asked to write a program to generate fibonacci series as our homework. so i wrote a program that generates the first n fibonacci numbers .here is my frist code that dosent work properly

# include <stdio.h>
void main()
{
    int a = -1, b = 1, c = 0, i, n, sum = 0 ;
    printf("Enter the limit : ") ;
    scanf("%d", &n) ;
    printf("\nThefibonacci series is : \n\n") ;

    for(i = 1 ; i <= n ; i++)
    {
        c = a + b ;
        printf("%d \t", c) ;
        b=c;
        a=b;
    }
}

so i tried various combinations and i found out that my code would work well if i interchanged the 12th and 13th lines. i.e

# include <stdio.h>
void main()
{
    int a = -1, b = 1, c = 0, i, n, sum = 0 ;
    printf("Enter the limit : ") ;
    scanf("%d", &n) ;
    printf("\nThefibonacci series is : \n\n") ;
    for(i = 1 ; i <= n ; i++)
    {
        c = a + b ;
        printf("%d \t", c) ;
        a=b;
        b=c;
    }
}

It is the same logic right. why does the first code give me wrong output?

what are segmentation faults?(my compiler frequently tells me that there are segmentation faults in my code)

P.S-i am a begginer.Just three weeks into c language and we are learning about loops.

share|improve this question
    
In your first alternative, you transitively assign c to both a and b. –  Anders Lindahl Nov 10 '12 at 11:38
    
@SameerSai thats just sarcasam :p programming code is executed line by line.. Exchanging lines = new Algorithm –  Pheonix Nov 10 '12 at 11:38
1  
@Sameer Sai: Insulting you? No. You are doing a fine job on your own. –  Mitch Wheat Nov 10 '12 at 11:40
    
@Mitch You could have worded that last comment a bit nicer though... –  phant0m Nov 10 '12 at 11:41
    
@MitchWheat: Never been a beginner yourself? OP might have a lousy instructor and problems with English and our response is to drive him away? "SO is doomed", indeed. –  Michael Foukarakis Nov 10 '12 at 13:21

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Lines are executed in order, so in the first example b becomes c before a becomes b, in effect you are assigning c to both a and b creating some kind of exponential series (but of zeroes) instead of the fibonacci sequence.

A segmentation fault means that your program is accessing memory somewhere where it is not allowed to access memory, usually because you are dereferencing an invalid pointer or accessing an array out of bounds.

share|improve this answer
    
ohhk i understand.! such a stupid mistake .ur explnation is great though thank you –  Sam Nov 10 '12 at 11:44

It is the same logic right. why does the first code give me wrong output?

Have you ever wondered, why

printf("Enter the limit : ") ;
scanf("%d", &n) ;
printf("\nThe fibonacci series is : \n\n") ;

first outputs Enter the limit, then waits for you to input a number, then outputs The fibonacci series is – in that particular order?

Why not the other way around or everything at the same time?


What are segmentation faults?

A simple google search would have given you tons of explanations. It means you have accessed memory, that is not yours to access.

share|improve this answer

In Fibonacci series, a new number is generated as sum of previous two numbers.

Lets say previous two numbers were A and B and the newly generated number is C. Now for the next iteration you need to forget A and B & C are your new previous numbers.

To make B and C you new A and B you need to do:

A = B   // B becomes the new A
B = C   // C becomes the new B

what you are doing is:

B = C   // C becomes the new B, but you've not saved the old value of B!!!
A = B   // Old value of B gone..B is now C, which is assigned to A
share|improve this answer

Look at this in isolation:

    c = a + b ;
    printf("%d \t", c) ;
    b=c;
    a=b;

The value of both a and bafter performing this will be c.

    c = a + b ;
    printf("%d \t", c) ;
    a=b;
    b=c;

If you re-arrange the statements, a gets the old value of b, and b gets the new value of c.

share|improve this answer

The ordering of statements matters.

b = c;
a = b;

When this runs, b and a will both be equal to the original value of c, and the old value of b has been lost. This is probably not what you wanted.

a = b;
b = c;

When this runs, a will equal the old value of b, and b will equal the original value of c.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.