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I want to do method chaining on class Point below.

#include <iostream>

class Point {
  public:
    Point(int x, int y): _x(x), _y(y) {}

    Point& moveX(int x);
    Point& moveY(int y);
    Point& print() const;

  ...
};

...

Point& Point::print() const {
  std::cout << "(" << _x << "," << _y << ")" << std::endl;
  return *this;  // Compile fails
}

I think it makes sense to mark print() as const member function because it just print the internal members. However, I want to do method chaining among both non-const and const function like below.

int main() {
  Point p(1,1);
  p.moveX(10).print().moveY(11); // method chaining
}

So I have to return this as non-const but it fails the compilation because, in my understanding, the members are marked const including this in const member function.

Is there a way to do method chaining in this situation?

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Is there something wrong with the keyboard? –  Ed Heal Nov 10 '12 at 12:39
    
What's wrong in my question? –  teerapap Nov 10 '12 at 12:42
    
Well, if you declare a method const you cant return non-const reference/pointer. Otherwise you could ruin the constness like you do in the last line. Thats why the compiler doesn't trust you –  TeaOverflow Nov 10 '12 at 12:49
    
@teerapap - Why not split it up into a series of lines? It will help in debugging –  Ed Heal Nov 10 '12 at 12:53
    
@EdHeal Edited. –  teerapap Nov 10 '12 at 13:05

4 Answers 4

up vote -2 down vote accepted

The reason why this fails is that inside a const member function, this is really a const Point*, not a Point*. Thus you are trying to initialize a non-const reference from a const pointer. It's not that the compiler isn't believing you, you're just asking for two incompatible things at one time.

This is one of the very few valid uses of const_cast, in my opinion. Normally, using const_cast is almost always a sign of a design error, or worse a programming error.
Here, the function is really const and should be const, but there is no reason why you shouldn't be able to chain something non-const afterwards, so it's arguably legitimate to do such a thing.

Do note, however, although the function is strictly const (in respect to the object, not so much in its use of IO functions!), one thing you should consider is that in some (rare) cases, it may result in code that doesn't do what you want. The compiler is allowed to cache the result of a const function and omit another call to the same const function (since you promised that it won't change anything). Therefore, it is allowable to optimize some_point.Print().Print(); into some_point.Print(). This is probably not a problem for you (why would you want to print the same values twice), just something to be generally aware of.

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1  
It is not true that "The compiler is allowed to cache the result of a const function and omit another call to the same const function (since you promised that it won't change anything)". It's not even true that a const function promises not to change anything. –  Steve Jessop Nov 10 '12 at 14:35
    
That's a terribly pedantic objection. A const member function promises that the client obvervable state does not change (wording from C++ FAQ), or less eloquently that the object pointed to by this cannot be modified by this function. This obviously cannot prevent you from maliciously modifying the object by aliasing this, but so what. Nobody can prevent you from lying to the compiler, it's pointless to complain about that. The C++ language cannot prevent you from modifying any of its objects from a different thread either. –  Damon Nov 10 '12 at 19:00
    
It's not pedantic at all, your answer contains a serious misunderstanding of const, and one that would cause a compiler that you wrote to be actually broken. The compiler is not permitted to assume that a const member function doesn't change the object. It's common for documented interfaces to guarantee that, when defining the "client-observable state" for a type. But the standard does not say that it's UB to modify a data member because of a call to a const member function, it only says that it's UB to modify a const object. The compiler can't assume you designed a sensible API. –  Steve Jessop Nov 10 '12 at 20:08
    
Also, quite aside from modifications to the object, the compiler cannot omit the second call to a const function because the function might have side-effects other than modifying the object (in this case, producing output). The compiler can't just ignore those. GCC lets you mark a function "pure", then it's more like what you're saying. –  Steve Jessop Nov 10 '12 at 20:16

You can provide two member functions, one const and one non-const. The const one will be called on a Point const, the non-const one on a Point.

class Point {
public:
    Point(int x, int y): _x(x), _y(y) {}

    Point& moveX(int x);
    Point& moveY(int y);
    Point& print();
    Point const& print() const;

    ...
};

As a side node, it’s better to overload std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream&, Point const&), so you can use it with any output stream, not just std::cout:

class Point {
    ...
private:
    friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& stream, Point const& point) {
        stream << "(" << point._x << "," << point._y << ")";
        return stream;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This seems to be an accepted answer for me too. Thanks for the side note. –  teerapap Nov 10 '12 at 13:43
    
And the non-const one can be implemented for example as Point& print() { static_cast<const Point *>(this)->print(); return *this; }. So in case you were worried, there's no need to duplicate any printing code. –  Steve Jessop Nov 10 '12 at 14:37

IMO you don't understand correctly what const methods can do. If const method return non-constant referance to your object, it's not constant method.

So in your situation you can simply return nothing from print method and use it at the end of the chaining like p.moveX(10).moveY(11).print();.

UPD. Or you can return const Point& if there is possibility that you will add some new const methods to your class.

share|improve this answer
    
I think that 'const' method tells the caller that this method don't mutate the object. I don't know its scope includes the returned object. –  teerapap Nov 10 '12 at 13:13
    
@teerapap returning non-constant reference of this opens possibility to mutate the object indirectly (from place where method is called). that is const method must not give this possibility. –  bellum Nov 10 '12 at 13:19

You can use a const_cast when returning (i.e. return const_cast<Point&>(*this)) - this will make sure that your method can't modify the objects, however the callers will be able to modify it.

share|improve this answer
    
I wouldn't advise it, simply because as you say it allows the caller to write something like const Point p(1,2); p.print().moveX(1);, which has undefined behavior. You could argue that it's the caller's fault, and the caller could argue that you shouldn't have written a const-unsafe interface. Since it's easy enough to write a const-safe version, you're trading away the benefits of compile-time const checking in return for reducing the code size by one small function. –  Steve Jessop Nov 10 '12 at 15:06
    
Agreed - actually I did some research on const_cast after posting the answer and read about the undefined behavior you're talking about, but there was already an accepted answer (which is pretty much the same) so decided not to edit. Thanks for noting it though. –  Ivan Vergiliev Nov 10 '12 at 15:47

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