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This is my text string:

0000> hello world <0000

I want to count the characters between "0000>" and "<0000".

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1  
Just for the record, if you are trying to parse an xml you shoud use a parser, not regex. – Chango Nov 10 '12 at 21:42
up vote 2 down vote accepted

This will work:

s = "0000> hello my name is james, whats yours? <0000";
s.match(/0000>(.*?)<0000/)[1].length // returns 38;

But then again, so will this :-)

s.length - 10; // returns 38
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This will do:

function count(string) {
  var match = /0000>(.*)<0000/g.exec(string);

  if (match.length > 1) {
    return match[1].trim().length;
  } else {
    return null;
  }
}

alert (count("0000> hello my name is james, whats yours? <0000"));

And the jsfiddle demo: http://jsfiddle.net/pSJGk/1/

share|improve this answer
    
unfortunately i still have a problem. this is my string: <svg width="500" height="500" xmlns="w3.org/2000/svg">; <!-- Created with SVG-edit - svg-edit.googlecode.com --> <g> <title>Layer 1</title> <rect id="svg_1" height="134" width="134" y="95" x="96" stroke-width="0" stroke="#000000" fill="#000000"/> <text xml:space="preserve" text-anchor="middle" font-family="verdana" font-size="24" id="svg_2" y="122" x="112" stroke="#6E6E6E" fill="none">really?</text> </g> </svg> i want to perform the calculations on this string and it doesnt seem to work. – Nicholas Kyriakides Nov 10 '12 at 17:57
    
the word i want to count in this example is the work "really?". Its between the words "none"> and </text> – Nicholas Kyriakides Nov 10 '12 at 18:28
    
If you want to parse xml use a parser, not regex – Chango Nov 10 '12 at 21:37

Well, something like this would count everything (including spaces) between 0000> and <0000:

'0000> hello my name is james, whats yours? <0000'
  .split(/0000>|<0000/g)[1].length; //=> 38

Or

'0000> hello my name is james, whats yours? <0000'
     .replace(/0000>|<0000/g,'').length; //=> 38
share|improve this answer
    
you don't need the last split(''). Strings have a length property of their own. – AHM Nov 10 '12 at 13:02
function getLengthBetween(str,startStr,stopStr) {
  var startPos = str.indexOf(startStr);
  if(startPos == -1) {
    return 0;
  }
  var startOffset = startPos+startStr.length;
  var stopPos  = str.indexOf(stopStr,startOffset);
  if(stopPos == -1) {
    stopPos = str.length;
  }
  return stopPos-startOffset;
}

Usage:

getLengthBetween("0000> hello my name is james, whats yours? <0000","0000>","<0000");
share|improve this answer
    
unfortunately i still have a problem. this is my string: <svg width="500" height="500" xmlns="w3.org/2000/svg">; <!-- Created with SVG-edit - svg-edit.googlecode.com --> <g> <title>Layer 1</title> <rect id="svg_1" height="134" width="134" y="95" x="96" stroke-width="0" stroke="#000000" fill="#000000"/> <text xml:space="preserve" text-anchor="middle" font-family="verdana" font-size="24" id="svg_2" y="122" x="112" stroke="#6E6E6E" fill="none">really?</text> </g> </svg> i want to perform the calculations on this string and it doesnt seem to work. – Nicholas Kyriakides Nov 10 '12 at 18:02
    
well I dont see the original 'strings' "0000>" and "<0000".. which text are you trying to find the length of in this string? – lostsource Nov 10 '12 at 18:10
    
actually that was an example. the original strings are fill="none"> and </text> respectively. its at the end of the string i just posted. in this example i need to count the characters of the word "really?". – Nicholas Kyriakides Nov 10 '12 at 18:18
    
its an xml output i think. does that make it any different? – Nicholas Kyriakides Nov 10 '12 at 18:22
    
assuming that string is assigned to variable 'myString' .. i tried getLengthBetween(myString,'fill="none">','</text>') and it gave me 7 .. as long as its of type 'string' it should work (even though it looks like xml) .. can you do an alert(typeof(myString)) ? it should say 'string' .. otherwise none of the answers here would work – lostsource Nov 10 '12 at 18:33

I'd suggest:

var str = " 0000> hello my name is james, whats yours? <0000",
    start = "0000>",
    end = "<0000",
    between = str.substring(str.indexOf(start) + start.length, str.indexOf(end)).length;

console.log(between);​

JS Fiddle demo.

This doesn't, however, trim the white-space from after the first match, or from before the second. This could be altered, of course, to match any given string delimiters by simply changing the variables.

References:

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