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Take a look at this:

print 41063625 ** (1.0/3)  # cube-root(41063625) = 345
print int(345.0)
print int(41063625 ** (1.0/3))

It outputs:

345.0
345
344

I was expecting the last line to be 345, since I was expecting int(41063625 ** (1.0/3)) to equal int(345.0) to in turn equal 345, as the other two outputs suggest. However, this is evidently not the case. Can anyone give me any insight as to what's going on here?

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3 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Print (or rather float.__str__) is rounding the output.

In [22]: str( 41063625 ** (1.0/3) )
Out[22]: '345.0'

The floating point representation for 41063625 ** (1.0/3) is less than 345, so when you take the int of it, you get 344 rather than 345.

In [15]: 41063625 ** (1.0/3)
Out[15]: 344.9999999999999

In [16]: int(345.0)
Out[16]: 345

In [17]: int(41063625 ** (1.0/3))
Out[17]: 344

If you want the closest int, you could use round:

In [18]: round(41063625 ** (1.0/3))
Out[18]: 345.0

or, to get an int:

In [19]: int(round(41063625 ** (1.0/3)))
Out[19]: 345
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Ah alright that makes sense - didn't know it was a feature of print to round like that. Thanks! –  arshajii Nov 10 '12 at 14:00
1  
It might be illustrative to post the output of str( 41063625 ** (1.0/3) ) since that is what print actually prints. –  mgilson Nov 10 '12 at 14:03
    
@mgilson: Thanks; so added. –  unutbu Nov 10 '12 at 14:06
    
@unutbu -- I saw. It's a good answer. +1 –  mgilson Nov 10 '12 at 14:07
2  
@A.R.S.: In 3.2+ float.__str__ uses the repr, which uses the minimum number of digits to round back to the original float. For example: print(41063625 ** (1.0/3)) outputs 344.9999999999999. –  eryksun Nov 10 '12 at 14:09
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because 41063625 ** (1.0/3) is not 345.0:

In [7]: 41063625 ** (1.0/3)
Out[7]: 344.9999999999999

In [8]: int(344.9999999999999)
Out[8]: 344
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Well, what I got from the calculations is something like this:

>>> 41063625 ** (1.0/3)
344.9999999999999
>>> int(345.0)
345
>>> int(41063625 ** (1.0/3))
344

So getting 344 is absolutely right. The internal representation of floating point numbers lacks some accuracy, so casting to int will always give the floor value.

You can use the round() function to get a more reasonable value.

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