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Is it possible using just one grep and regexp combination to achieve the following. Say I have a file like so:

$ cat f.txt
line 1 foo
line 2 boo
no match
line 3 blank
line X no match

I want to match all the lines that start with the word line and followed by a number but only display the what come after that, so the part that is matched by (.*).

$ grep -E '^line [0-9]+(.*)' f.txt 
line 1 foo
line 2 boo
line 3 blank

Can you say match but don't display this part ^line [0-9]+ like doing the inverse of grep -o '^line [0-9]+'

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In other words, you need to show only foo, boo and blank? If so, couldn't you just add the expected output to the question? It'll make it much more clean. –  raina77ow Nov 10 '12 at 15:51
1  
Couldn't you have just edited the question if you thought it was unclear. The example isn't important, I just want to know if its possible to omit certain parts of the match from the output using regexp –  user1814699 Nov 10 '12 at 15:57
1  
Sigh. With regexes, examples (of input and expected output) are ALWAYS important - I've yet to see the question that contradicts this rule. Anyway, it's not possible to use the capturing groups with grep, I suppose. –  raina77ow Nov 10 '12 at 16:00
    
Its possible with -P option in grep. check this stackoverflow.com/q/22928443/950979 –  Renjith Apr 8 at 8:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Given your example file:

$ cat cat_1.txt
line 1 foo
line 2 boo
no match
line 3 blank
line X no match

This is easy with Perl:

perl -lne 'print $1 if /^line \d+ (.*)/' cat_1.txt

Or with sed:

sed -En 's/^line [0-9]+ (.*)/\1/p' cat_1.txt

Either case, prints:

foo
boo
blank
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I like the sed solution, I have accepted this answer but it says I need 15 reputation to upvote :/ –  user1814699 Nov 10 '12 at 16:19
    
Why the down vote? –  Pyson Nov 10 '12 at 16:21
    
I up-voted you? –  user1814699 Nov 10 '12 at 16:27
    
@user100101011: Thanks! Someone else seems to have down-voted for no explained reason. Good luck! –  Pyson Nov 10 '12 at 16:30

You can use sed

~$ cat 1.txt
line 1 foo
line 2 boo
no match
line 3 blank
line X no match


$ grep -E '^line [0-9]' 1.txt | sed 's/^line [0-9] //'
foo
boo
blank

UPDATED ...or without using sed

$ grep -E '^line [0-9]' 1.txt | grep -oE '[a-z]*$'
foo
boo
blank
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2  
Useless use of cat award –  Colt 45 Nov 10 '12 at 17:03
    
actually, yes. I put 'cat' just for visibility –  Andrii Sergiienko Nov 10 '12 at 17:36

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