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I'm getting a little bit confused about how to organize my integration tests. Right now, they are organized according to page structure:

post_pages_spec.rb:

require 'spec_helper'

describe "Post pages" do

  describe "show page" do

    describe "post destruction" do

    end

    describe "edit" do

    end

  end

  describe "post creation" do

  end


end

As you can see, delete and edit are inside the show action, because they appear in the show page.

This is another way of organizing them (based on the REST actions):

post_pages_spec.rb:

require 'spec_helper'

describe "Post pages" do

  describe "show page" do

  end

  describe "post destruction" do

  end

  describe "post creation" do

  end

  describe "edit" do

  end
end

Which structure is clearer and easier to maintain?

share|improve this question
    
I'd simply do functional testing there – apneadiving Nov 10 '12 at 18:00
    
@apneadiving Sorry, but what's functional testing? – alexchenco Nov 11 '12 at 1:03
    
It's how controller tests are named after. – apneadiving Nov 11 '12 at 10:04
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Assuming you really are asking about integration tests and not controller tests, I like to organize integration tests from the users perspective, and by the type of user. Ex. one file for registered users, one file for admins, one for not registered users, etc and as necessary.

The justification for this is that I have found, as a general heuristic, that the same user types have the same prerequisites for a feature, and thus fit well together. For example, a registered user viewing a post might have a lot of scenarios focusing on CRUDing existing post content, where a non-registered user might have scenarios focusing on post recommendations. Since is likely that these different perspectives would have different setups and teardowns, it is also likely that they will be easier (ie. DRY-er etc) to maintain separately.

Also, it reads nice :) Ex:

describe "Registered User" do
  context 'creating a Post' do
    it "succeeds given all fields are filled out"
    it "displays errors to the author if a field is missing"
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion. But that means that each model will have many integration tests? Wouldn't that be confusing? (By the way, I've never used context before. I directly use it. What's the benefit of using context?) – alexchenco Nov 11 '12 at 23:59
    
I'd define an integration test as something more abstract than any one model, and defined as such it would be confusing to have your integration suite model-oriented. Yes, there happens to be a primary model per interaction in simple cases, but in any complex app that boundary will quickly be crossed. Ex. a setup wizard that registers a user, creates a basic profile, and starts a blog post. Or an eCommerce system where payment (stored separately) is made as a part of the order page. On the integration level, I care that checkout works, not particularly that payment or orders work. – Woody Nov 12 '12 at 0:33
    
Also, context is an alias for describe, used just to help the reader. describe would work fine here also. I use capybaras feature` and scenario for these cases, which are the same as describe and context, just sound better for integration tests. So wrote that kind of out of habit :) – Woody Nov 12 '12 at 0:37
    
so, context, describe, feature, scenario, are all the same? When do you use feature/scenario? – alexchenco Nov 12 '12 at 0:57

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