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I'm trying to perform a query in Mysql to obtain the all time ranking of a user. For ranking of the month I managed to do it with the following request:

SELECT MAX(x.rank) AS rank
  FROM (SELECT 
               t.id_user,
               @rownum := @rownum + 1 AS rank
          FROM screengame_points t
          JOIN (SELECT @rownum := 0) r
          WHERE month = $month
      ORDER BY t.points DESC) x
 WHERE x.id_user = 4

For all time i need to calculate the sum of all the pointss, so I tried:

SELECT MAX(x.rank) AS rank
  FROM (SELECT 
               t.id_user,
               @rownum := @rownum + 1 AS rank
          FROM screengame_points t
          JOIN (SELECT @rownum := 0) r
    GROUP BY id_user
      ORDER BY sum(t.points) DESC) x
 WHERE x.id_user = 4

(note the "group by id_user" and the "sum(t.points)" ).

But it's not working. I think that the ranking's result in the second request is from the one with the biggest score in one month to the one with the worst. It's not on the sum of all the points of all the month.

How could I do it?

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2 Answers 2

I suspect the problem is that the ORDER BY is being optimized away, in both cases. You may simply be lucky in the first case.

MySQL documentation does say that ORDER BY is allowed in subqueries. However, there is an interesting discussion here with respect to UNION.

However, use of ORDER BY for individual SELECT statements implies nothing about the order in which the rows appear in the final result because UNION by default produces an unordered set of rows. Therefore, the use of ORDER BY in this context is typically in conjunction with LIMIT, so that it is used to determine the subset of the selected rows to retrieve for the SELECT, even though it does not necessarily affect the order of those rows in the final UNION result. If ORDER BY appears without LIMIT in a SELECT, it is optimized away because it will have no effect anyway.

I emphasize that this is with respect to the UNION clause; I can't find anything with respect to a simple subquery. However, ORDER BY is not allowed in standard SQL, except at the outermost level. The reason is simple . . . tables and subqueries are unordered.

You may be able to trick MySQL by including a LIMIT clause in the subqueries. Put in a large enough number to get all users (although this could, in theory, be optimized away).

You have two other options for getting this information. If your tables are not too big, you can use a self-join to get the ranking information. You can also insert into a temporary table with an auto-increment column; I think the order by will work there. (And I'm discounting switching databases, because almost all other databases support the rank function.)

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The limit is not solving the problem. And the strange thing is that if I execute only my subquery, the first row is really the first user id, but the associated rank is wrong. I can have a result like : {id_user:4, rank:2}{id_user:1, rank:1} and my result should be {id_user:4, rank:1}{id_user:1, rank:2} –  darkheir Nov 11 '12 at 10:03

I found a solution, but I think the query my be performing slowly with a lot of records!

SELECT WrappedQuery.rank 
FROM (SELECT @rownum := @rownum +1 as rank, id_user
      FROM ( select @rownum := 0 ) sqlvars,
           (SELECT  t.id_user
            FROM screengame_points t
        GROUP BY id_user
            ORDER BY sum(t.points) DESC
        ) x 
     ) WrappedQuery
WHERE id_user = 4
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