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Overriding parent class’s function

I'm struggling with calling a virtual function in C++.

I'm not experienced in C++, I mainly use C# and Java so I might have some delusions, but bear with me.

I have to write a program where I have to avoid dynamic memory allocation if possible. I have made a class called List:

template <class T> class List {
public:
    T items[maxListLength];
    int length;


    List() {
        length = 0;
    }

    T get(int i) const {
        if (i >= 0 && i < length) {
            return items[i];
        } else {
            throw "Out of range!";
        }
    };

    // set the value of an already existing element
    void set(int i, T p) {
        if (i >= 0 && i < length) {
            items[i] = p;
        } else {
            throw "Out of range!";
        }
    }

    // returns the index of the element
    int add(T p) {
        if (length >= maxListLength) {
            throw "Too many points!";
        }
        items[length] = p;
        return length++;
    }

    // removes and returns the last element;
    T pop() {
        if (length > 0) {
            return items[--length];
        } else {
            throw "There is no element to remove!";
        }
    }
};

It just makes an array of the given type, and manages the length of it.

There is no need for dynamic memory allocation, I can just write:

List<Object> objects;
MyObject obj;
objects.add(obj);

MyObject inherits form Object. Object has a virtual function which is supposed to be overridden in MyObject:

struct Object {
    virtual float method(const Input& input) {
        return 0.0f;
    }
};

struct MyObject: public Object {
    virtual float method(const Input& input) {
        return 1.0f;
    }
};

I get the elements as:

objects.get(0).method(asdf);

The problem is that even though the first element is a MyObject, the Object's method function is called. I'm guessing there is something wrong with storing the object in an array of Objects without dynamically allocating memory for the MyObject, but I'm not sure.

Is there a way to call MyObject's method function? How? It's supposed to be a heterogeneous collection btw, so that's why the inheritance is there in the first place.

If there is no way to call the MyObject's method function, then how should I make my list in the first place?

Also I have no access to libraries outside of math.h and stdlib.h, so vector is not available for example.

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marked as duplicate by Mat, SingerOfTheFall, Chad, Justin Satyr, arshajii Nov 12 '12 at 23:02

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
Object slicing is always fun. You need a List of pointers. –  chris Nov 10 '12 at 16:57
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/274626/… for what slicing is –  Mat Nov 10 '12 at 16:58
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When you do this:

objects.add(obj);

you are adding a copy of the Object part of the MyObject to the list, so it is no longer a MyObject.

You might be tempted to try doing this:

int add(T const &p) {
    if (length >= maxListLength) {
        throw "Too many points!";
    }
    items[length] = p; // now the problem is here
    return length++;
}

but now the copy of the Object part of p happens during the assignment.

To make the list be heterogeneous, it is going to have to be a list of pointers, but you also wanted to avoid dynamic memory allocation. You can avoid dynamic memory allocation if you are careful:

 Object obj1;
 MyObject obj2;
 List<Object*> object_ptrs;
 object_ptrs.add(&obj1);
 object_ptrs.add(&obj2);
 object_ptr.get(1)->method(input);
 object_ptr.get(0)->method(input);

but again, you have to be very careful. The list is now pointing to the two objects on the stack. If you return from this function, those two objects will be destroyed. Note that I've purposefully put the list of object pointers after the objects, so that the list will get destroyed before the objects, so the list won't be left pointing to garbage. However, if you return a copy of the list, you would still have a problem.

share|improve this answer
    
What if the add function has the parameter add(T& p)? –  SoonDead Nov 10 '12 at 17:02
1  
@SoonDead: That will just defer the problem until the assignment. When you say items[length]=p, you will just be copying the Object part of p. –  Vaughn Cato Nov 10 '12 at 17:04
    
The function signature is fine, but it gets sliced when added in the list... –  Caribou Nov 10 '12 at 17:04
    
Thanks you for this answer, it is much clearer now what is happening. –  SoonDead Nov 10 '12 at 17:14
    
If I write a destructor to my list implementation will I be able to free up the memory created by new there? Will the destructor be called after the function ends where I have written List<Object*> obj_ptrs; ? –  SoonDead Nov 10 '12 at 17:19
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You need to store pointers in the list. Try this:

List<Object*> objects;
Object *obj1 = new Object;
MyObject *obj2 = new MyObject;
Object *obj3 = new MyObject;

objects.add(obj1);
objects.add(obj2);
objects.add(obj3);

// This calls the implementation in Object class
objects.get(0)->method(asdf);

// This calls the implementation in MyObject class
objects.get(1)->method(asdf);

// This calls the implementation in MyObject class
// Polymorphism here
objects.get(2)->method(asdf);

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
I ended up accepting the other answer as there were a pretty good explanation of what is happening there, but this answer also helped. –  SoonDead Nov 10 '12 at 17:12
    
Glad you figured it out. –  Vaibhav Desai Nov 10 '12 at 17:50
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