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I have an HTML table with large number of rows, and I need to right align one column.

I know the following ways,

<tr><td>..</td><td>..</td><td align='right'>10.00</td><tr>

and

<tr><td>..</td><td>..</td><td class='right-align-class'>10.00</td><tr>

In both the methods, I have to repeat the align or class parameter on every <tr> tag. (If there are 1000 rows, I have to put align='right' or class='right-align-class' 1000 times.)

Is there any efficient way to do this ? Is there any direct way to say, align the third column in all rows to right ?

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10 Answers

up vote 22 down vote accepted

To answer your question directly: no. There is no more simple way to get a consistent look and feel across all modern browsers, without repeating the class on the column. (Although, see below re: nth-child.)

The following is the most efficient way to do this.

HTML:

<table class="products">
  <tr>
    <td>...</td>
    <td>...</td>
    <td class="price">10.00</td>
    <td>...</td>
    <td>...</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>...</td>
    <td>...</td>
    <td class="price">11.45</td>
    <td>...</td>
    <td>...</td>
  </tr>
</table>

CSS:

table.products td.price {
  text-align: right;
}

Why you shouldn't use nth-child:

The CSS3 pseudo-selector, nth-child, would be perfect for this -- and much more efficient -- but it is impractical for use on the actual web as it exists today. It is not supported by several major modern browsers, including all IE's from 6-8. Unfortunately, this means that nth-child is unsupported in a significant share (at least 40%) of browsers today.

So, nth-child is awesome, but if you want a consistent look and feel, it's just not feasible to use.

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Why is this getting upvoted? He just repeated the same method the OP already knew about. –  cdmckay Aug 26 '09 at 18:44
9  
Yes, and he also answered what the original poster wanted to know, which was whether there was any more efficient way to accomplish what he wanted. So... Not sure what your point is. –  bigmattyh Aug 26 '09 at 20:10
    
But it's not more efficient. Having to add a class to each td is the most compatible way, but not the most efficient. The most efficient way would be to use the nth-child(3) selector. –  cdmckay Aug 27 '09 at 3:11
5  
Okay, perhaps I should have emphasized that the nth-child selector is not supported by several modern browsers still in wide use today. There's no point in using an efficient technique if it fails on a significant portion of your audience. kimblim.dk/css-tests/selectors –  bigmattyh Aug 27 '09 at 5:18
2  
IE6 is still 10% of the browsing population -- and you still have to contend with that. That is, unless you are catering to a niche crowd (say, creating a site to sell Mac software). Believe me: I would love to persuade my clients to drop support for IE6, but the stats are just not persuasive. Too many people use it. I'm fine with offering IE6 users a less-than-optimal experience, but it is the rare client who will sign off on that. And besides, it's really not a big deal anyway. Our job is to deliver results, not perfection. –  bigmattyh Aug 27 '09 at 16:59
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If it's always the third column, you can use this (assuming table class of "products"). It's kinda hacky though, and not robust if you add a new column.

table.products td+td+td {
  text-align: right;
}
table.products td,
table.products td+td+td+td {
  text-align: left;
}

But honestly, the best idea is to use a class on each cell. You can use the col element to set the width, border, background or visibility of a column, but not any other properties. Reasons discussed here.

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...and doesn't work in IE6. Otherwise nice though. :) –  deceze Aug 27 '09 at 5:39
    
also doesn't work if you use variable colspan (or any rowspan) on some of the preceding columns –  user340140 Aug 27 '13 at 2:28
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The <colgroup> and <col> tags that lives inside tables are designed for this purpose. If you have three columns in your table and want to align the third, add this after your opening <table> tag:

 <colgroup>
     <col />
     <col />
     <col class="your-right-align-class" />
 </colgroup>

along with the requisite CSS:

 .your-right-align-class { text-align: right; }

From the W3:

Definition and Usage

  • The <col> tag defines attribute values for one or more columns in a table.

  • The <col> tag is useful for applying styles to entire columns, instead of repeating the styles for each cell, for each row.

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For some reason this doesn't seem to work for HTML email in GMail. –  jpierson Mar 8 '12 at 0:48
    
Email clients have limited support for many kinds of styling, including and especially non-inline styles—e.g., styling based on classes. To work in all email clients, the individual TDs may need style="text-align: right;" or align="right". –  supertrue Aug 15 '12 at 15:24
    
This solution doesn't work. Please refer to stackoverflow.com/questions/1238115/… for better explanation. –  Custódio Oct 9 '13 at 15:41
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Looking through your exact question to your implied problem:

Step 1: Use the class as you described (or, if you must, use inline styles).

Step 2: Turn on GZIP compression.

Works wonders ;)

This way GZIP removes the redundancy for you (over the wire, anyways) and your source remains standards compliant.

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2  
-1, using inline styles for this is very bad advice. –  cdmckay Aug 26 '09 at 6:10
2  
+1 for turning on GZIP. Seriously, this answer does not warrant 3 downvotes. Other less compatible answer should be voted down instead. –  Adrian Godong Aug 26 '09 at 10:10
    
I wasn't advocating inline styles as the best way by any means. It was just one possibility on how to solve the problem. –  John Gietzen Aug 26 '09 at 11:55
    
+1, downvoters explain? This is not any different than the top answer at the moment, and on top of that it is the only sensible solution. –  Jan Zich Aug 26 '09 at 14:58
    
Whether it's "sensible" depends on the goal: the original question sounded like it was about semantic repetition, not bandwidth, so GZIP sounds irrelevant to me. The FAQ says downvotes on SO are for "off topic or incorrect" answers. IMHO, simply being "less compatible" should not be grounds for downvoting, but GZIP is borderline offtopic. (FWIW, I did not downvote anything on this page.) (Goodbye, karma! I barely knew ye.) –  Ken Aug 26 '09 at 15:53
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What you really want here is:

<col align="right"/>

but it looks like Gecko doesn't support this yet: it's been an open bug for over a decade.

(Geez, why can't Firefox have decent standards support like IE6?)

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2  
Align is a deprecated attribute so Firefox has no reason to support it. –  austin cheney Aug 26 '09 at 6:55
1  
Hmm yes, but what was the reason for its deprecation? It seems to be useful. If not the align attribute, it would be useful to style it using CSS. I know that it could possibly lead to some precedence issues (because nowhere else an element can transfer styles to other element), but still ... –  Jan Zich Aug 26 '09 at 10:09
1  
There are only 4 properties allowed on columns, see stackoverflow.com/questions/1119106/… –  DisgruntledGoat Aug 26 '09 at 12:07
    
Those 4 are the only CSS properties. HTML4.01 allows more document attributes on the col tag. For example, "span" (which would be a little silly to put in CSS). And "align" is deprecated in 'table' and 'caption', but I don't see anywhere that says it's deprecated for 'col'. –  Ken Aug 26 '09 at 15:37
    
"Geez, why can't Firefox have decent standards support like IE6?)" HAHA! fantastic comment! So untrue but indeed funny! –  Jesper Rønn-Jensen Sep 8 '09 at 8:10
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You could use the nth-child pseudo-selector. For example:

table.align-right-3rd-column td:nth-child(3)
{
  text-align: right;
}

Then in your table do:

<table class="align-right-3rd-column">
  <tr>
    <td></td><td></td><td></td>
    ...
  </tr>
</table>

Edit:

Unfortunately, this only works in Firefox 3.5. However, if your table only has 3 columns, you could use the sibling selector, which has much better browser support. Here's what the style sheet would look like:

table.align-right-3rd-column td + td + td
{
  text-align: right;
}

This will match any column preceded by two other columns.

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1  
Unfortunately not a very compatible solution. –  deceze Aug 26 '09 at 5:21
    
@cdmckay: actually it should work in the latest versions of Firefox, Opera, Chrome and Safari. No IE support though. –  DisgruntledGoat Aug 26 '09 at 12:08
    
Would any of the downvoters care to say what is wrong with this answer? –  cdmckay Aug 27 '09 at 3:14
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This doesn't work in IE6, which may be an issue, but it'll work in IE7+ and Firefox, Safari etc. It'll align the 3rd column right and all of the subsequent columns left.

td + td + td { text-align: right; }
td + td + td + td { text-align: left; }
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it won't work at all if I do <td rowspan='2'> in the first cell. –  user340140 Aug 27 '13 at 2:30
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if you have only two "kinds" of column styles - use one as TD and one as TH. Then, declare a class for the table and a sub-class for that table's THs and TDs. Then your HTML can be super efficient.

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A number of years ago (in the IE only days) I was using the <col align="right"> tag, but I just tested it and and it seems to be an IE only feature:

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"
    "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<html>
<head>
    <title>Test</title>
</head>
<body>
    <table width="100%" border="1">
        <col align="left" />
        <col align="left" />
        <col align="right" />
        <tr>
            <th>ISBN</th>
            <th>Title</th>
            <th>Price</th>
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <td>3476896</td>
            <td>My first HTML</td>
            <td>$53</td>
        </tr>
    </table>
</body>
</html>

The snippet is taken from www.w3schools.com. Of course, it should not be used (unless for some reason you really target the IE rendering engine only), but I thought it would be interesting to mention it.

Edit:

Overall, I don't understand the reasoning behing abandoning this tag. It would appear to be very useful (at least for manual HTML publishing).

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Is anybody actually reading my answer? I did not say it should be used in real life for real website. It was a historical remark, and I suggested using this only if targeting IE rendering engine (not necessarily for webpages). –  Jan Zich Aug 26 '09 at 15:03
    
Firefox didn't drop support in 3.5; it never had support for this. –  Ken Aug 26 '09 at 15:47
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Use jquery to apply class to all tr unobtrusively.

$(”table td”).addClass(”right-align-class″);

Use enhanced filters on td in case you want to select a particular td.

See jquery

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He just wants the third column aligned. –  John Gietzen Aug 26 '09 at 5:03
    
Plus, this doesn't work for non-JavaScript users. –  John Gietzen Aug 26 '09 at 5:05
    
Plus, it's an overkill and may cause FOUC. –  Jan Zich Aug 26 '09 at 10:12
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