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I have to generate a 78MHz clock (duty cycle 0.5 or 0.7) from a 100MHz base clock (duty cycle 0.5) using VHDL language (so the ratio is 200/156). I know that I can use DCM, PLL or similar, but at this moment (unfortunately) I just can't.

Therefore I thought to use (excluding any DCM or PLL) a simple frequency divider, but in this case I also know that the frequency can be divided only by integer numbers (and minimum 2, because I would use counters to do that - and In my case I have to divide the base clock by 1,2820512820512820512820512820513...).

So I have no idea how to realize that without using any DCM or other stuff... I thought to divide the 100MHz clock in smaller frequencies (like 50MHz, 25MHz etc.) and adding them (50+25+3 for example), but is this the right way (logically I don't think so)?

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1  
How much jitter can you tolerate ? –  Paul R Nov 10 '12 at 20:50
    
Does it need to be 50-50 or you can accept something like 35-65? –  FarhadA Nov 10 '12 at 22:25
    
Unfortunately I can't accept 35-65 (do you mean duty cycle, right?). I can only accept 50% or 70% duty cycle... @PaulR I really don't know how much jitter I can tolerate... I don't think it's a problem for now by the way. –  Pierpaolo Bagnasco Nov 10 '12 at 23:26
    
Without any more specifics about how to interpret notation, 35-65 duty cycle (same as saying 65%) is better than 70% duty cycle (same as saying 30-70) unless you are assuming that the percentage means only the high time or something like that. –  wjl Nov 12 '12 at 20:01
    
0.7 duty cycle means that for the 70% of the period the value is high (1). Sorry for my bad English ^^ –  Pierpaolo Bagnasco Nov 12 '12 at 21:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
+50

Here is a generic fractional M/D clock divider design that should solve your problem. I wrote this for my own use a few years ago. You might want to use std_logic instead of bit depending on what device you are targeting.

The basic idea is to use an accumulator keep track of the fractional clock phase. This is very similar to how you implement a direct-digital synthesizer (DDS) but only has to worry about clocks.

Enjoy! =)

In case it's not clear how to use this, the parameters you'd use for a multiplier of 39 and a divisor of 50, as 100 * 39/100 = 78, so the required operand width is 6 (because 2**6 = 64). Note that because this is more than half the input clock rate, no synchronous logic can generate an output clock signal, so this block's only valid output at that rate will be the clock enable.

Also note that the worst case for any possible divisor value is 33%/66% duty-cycle for any one cycle. Your particular choices of multiplier and divisor may be better (I'd need to do some math to tell), but you can't get any better that than in the worst case in general with any algorithm that uses rational division. You could clean up the output of this block with a real hardware PLL or DLL to filter the phase noise and get the duty cycle into your target range.

-- Copyright © 2010 Wesley J. Landaker <wjl@icecavern.net>
-- 
-- This program is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify
-- it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
-- the Free Software Foundation, either version 3 of the License, or
-- (at your option) any later version.
-- 
-- This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
-- but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
-- MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
-- GNU General Public License for more details.
-- 
-- You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
-- along with this program.  If not, see <http://www.gnu.org/licenses/>.

library ieee;
use ieee.numeric_bit.all;

-- Clock Divider
-- =============
--
-- Fractionally divides the input clock using simultaneous frequency
-- multiplication and division.
--
-- Outputs both a clock enable and a balanced duty-cycle clock. The clock's
-- duty-cycle is as always close to 50% as possible, worst case is 33%/66%.
--
-- Details
-- =======
--
-- Given:
--
--   Fi = input frequency Hz
--   M  = multiplier
--   D  = divisor
--   Fo = output frequency Hz
--
-- Where:
--
--   M ≤ D
--
-- Then:
--
--        ⎧    M
--        ⎪ Fi·—        if M <= D
--   Fo = ⎨    D
--        ⎪
--        ⎩ undefined   if M > D
--
--
-- If (M/D) is greater than 0.5, only the clock enable is valid.
-- If (M/D) is greater than 1.0, both outputs are invalid.

entity Clock_Divider is
  generic (
    operand_width : positive
    );
  port (
    clock : in bit;
    reset : in bit;

    multiplier : in unsigned(operand_width-1 downto 0);
    divisor    : in unsigned(operand_width-1 downto 0);

    out_enable : buffer bit;
    out_clock  : buffer bit
    );
end entity;

architecture any of Clock_Divider is
  signal enable_2x : bit;
begin

  -- Divide the clock by accumulating phase using the mulitplier and
  -- subtracting when we pass the divisor value.

  proc_enable : process is
    variable phase : unsigned(operand_width downto 0);
  begin
    wait until rising_edge(clock);
    phase := phase + multiplier;
    if phase >= divisor then
      phase := phase - divisor;
      out_enable <= '1';
    else
      out_enable <= '0';
    end if;
    if reset = '1' then
      phase := (others => '0');
      out_enable <= '0';
    end if;
  end process;

  proc_enable : process is
    variable phase : unsigned(operand_width downto 0);
  begin
    wait until rising_edge(clock);
    phase := phase + (multiplier & '0');
    if phase >= divisor then
      phase := phase - divisor;
      enable_2x <= '1';
    else
      enable_2x <= '0';
    end if;
    if reset = '1' then
      phase := (others => '0');
      enable_2x <= '0';
    end if;
  end process;


  proc_out_clock : process is
  begin
    wait until rising_edge(clock);
    if enable_2x = '1' then
      out_clock <= not out_clock;
    end if;
  end process;

end architecture;
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Thanks for the answer! I just tried your code using "entity work.Clock_Divider(any) generic map(6) port map(clk, '0', to_unsigned(39, 6), to_unsigned(50, 6), clk78_enable, clk78_o);" and creating a test bench, but I don't get the 78MHz clock on the output :( –  Pierpaolo Bagnasco Nov 12 '12 at 22:21
1  
Yes, that's actually expected. Notice the line from the docs: If (M/D) is greater than 0.5, only the clock enable is valid.. 39/50 = 0.78, so you are only the clock enable output will be valid. (It will be high for one 100 MHz clock cycle every 78 MHz period) That's the best you can do with synchronous logic. You could alternately generate a 39 MHz clock, which this block will do directly, and double it with an external PLL. –  wjl Nov 12 '12 at 23:25
    
Or double the 100 MHz input first. –  wjl Nov 12 '12 at 23:34
    
Sorry, but maybe I'm wrong, but I still don't get a 78MHz output... Here is a screenshot of the simulation: i.imgur.com/8JaBN.png Am I missing something? –  Pierpaolo Bagnasco Nov 13 '12 at 15:21
1  
In case it's still not 100% clear: when the clock enable is used along with the input clock, it is effectively telling you that the desired output clock has a rising edge during this input clock cycle. (You don't get any information about where the falling edges are, as they are often "between" input clock cycles.) This isn't exactly what you asked for (an actual self-standing toggling clock), but you can't get what you want with synchronous logic going from 100 MHz to 78 MHz. (You can with various asynchronous logic designs that rely to the characteristics of individual gates). –  wjl Nov 13 '12 at 16:58

Thoroughly off-the-wall idea, somewhat technology specific so may not suit your goals, and quite quite horrible...

it is obvious that you cannot do this without any of (a) PLL, (b) DLL, (c) a much higher frequency clock or (d) 5ns p-p jitter.

You need many more clock edges available to you, but (assuming) you have no more clock edges, you will have to generate your own. One tech specific (Xilinx) way would be to feed your clock out, and back in via multiple pins, with different IBUFDELAY settings on each. Actual settings might be calibrated by experiment (or even on power up) and would be subject to drift with temperature, naturally.

Another way might be a chain of LUTs successively delaying the clock, with logic to detect that the n'th was delayed longer than a half cycle. (Or a whole cycle) Then tap n/2 is roughly 90 degrees late, n/4 is 45 degrees late, etc. (You cannot ensure consistency in these timings. Still, floorplanning and locking down this core will help to an extent.)

Either way, once you have multiple phases of 100MHz clock, you can apply them to the DDS (fractional divider) described above. Performance is unlikely to be stable, but ought to be better than the current best 5ns...

(And yes I am aware that this is tantamount to rolling your own (and inferior) DLL. Does that count as cheating?)

For a lower complexity approach, you can try Peter Alfke's delay/XOR trick to get 200MHz out of your 100MHz clock. There are no guarantees on its M/S ratio, but it does give you 4 edges to play with...

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