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Here is a sample of the main code ("Library/stack.h" doesn't really matter, but in any case, it is the last source included in this previous question of mine):

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>

#include <iostream>
#include <tinythread.h>

#include "Library/stack.h"

using namespace std;
using namespace tthread;

#define BOULDERspd 100

// ========================================================================= //

struct Coord {
    int x, y;
};

int randOneIn (float n) {
    return ((int) (n * (rand() / (RAND_MAX + 1.0))));
}
int randOneIn (int n) {
    return ((int) ((float) n * (rand() / (RAND_MAX + 1.0))));
}

// ========================================================================= //

#include <windows.h>
void gotoxy (int column, int line) {
    if ((column >= 0) && (line >= 0)) {
        COORD coord;
        coord.X = column;
        coord.Y = line;
        SetConsoleCursorPosition(
            GetStdHandle( STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE ),
            coord
        );
    }
}

void gotoxy (Coord pos) {
    gotoxy(pos.x, pos.y);
}

// ========================================================================= //

void render (char image, Coord pos) {
    gotoxy(pos);
    cout << image;
}

void unrender (Coord pos) {
    gotoxy(pos);
    cout << ' ';
}

// ========================================================================= //

char randimage (void) {
    return (rand() % 132) + 123;
}

mutex xylock;

class Boulder {
    char avatar;
    Coord pos;

    public:
        Boulder (int inix) {
            pos.x = inix;
            pos.y = 0;

            avatar = randimage();
        };

        void fall (void) {

            unrender(pos);
            pos.y++;
            render(avatar, pos);

            Sleep(BOULDERspd);
        };

        void live (void) {
            do {
                fall();
            } while (y() < 20);
            die();
        };

        void die (void) {
            unrender(pos);
            pos.y = 0;
        };

        int x (void) { return pos.x; };
        int y (void) { return pos.y; };
};

// ========================================================================= //

class thrStack: public Stack<thread*> {
    public:
        thrStack (): Stack<thread*> () { };

        void pushNrun (thread* elem) {
            push(elem);
            top->core->joinable();
        }
};

void randBoulder (void* arg) {
    srand(time(NULL));
    Boulder boulder(rand() % 40);

    boulder.live();
}

void Boulders (void* arg) {
    srand(time(NULL));
    thrStack stack;

    do {
        stack.pushNrun(new thread (randBoulder, 0));
        Sleep(rand() % 300);
    } while(1);
}

// ========================================================================= //
// ========================================================================= //

int main() {
    thread raining (Boulders, 0);

    raining.join();
}

I'm new to multi-threading so, to fiddle around with it, I'm trying to make a program that makes random characters constantly fall from the top of the screen, as if it were raining ASCII symbols.

I've noticed, however, a little (big) error in my coding:

bool xylock = false;

class Boulder {
    char avatar;
    Coord pos;

    public:
        Boulder (int inix) {
            pos.x = inix;
            pos.y = 0;

            avatar = randimage();
        };

        void fall (void) {

            unrender(pos);
            pos.y++;
            render(avatar, pos);

            Sleep(BOULDERspd);
        };

        void live (void) {
            do {
                fall();
            } while (y() < 20);
            die();
        };

        void die (void) {
            unrender(pos);
            pos.y = 0;
        };

        int x (void) { return pos.x; };
        int y (void) { return pos.y; };
};

Because the fall() function uses gotoxy, which changes the 'global cursor', multiple calls to gotoxy would mess up the intended execution of the program. If you try to compile the code as-is, you'd get falling letters that constantly switch position and leave garbage of themselves behind.

Is there any way to use or implement a lock for this and future situations alike with just TinyThread? What is the logic of locks implementing in C++, in general?


EDIT: Modified fall(); is it okay, Caribou?

        void fall (void) {
            lock_guard<mutex> guard(xylock);

            unrender(pos);
            pos.y++;
            render(avatar, pos);

            xylock.unlock();

            Sleep(BOULDERspd);
        };
share|improve this question
    
Where do you start the threads? Have I miss something in your code? –  marscode Nov 10 '12 at 18:46
    
@marscode In main() (found in the first source, but not in the latter), I create a thread that calls the void Boulders (void* arg) function. This function, in turn, instantiates a thread stack (going by thrStack stack), and constantly pushes new threads calling void randboulder into this stack for them to run. –  Mutoh Nov 10 '12 at 19:20
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use the tinythread lib:

http://tinythreadpp.bitsnbites.eu/doc/

Look specifically at lock_guard and mutex

multiple calls to gotoxy would mess up the intended execution of the program. If you try to compile the code as-is, you'd get falling letters that constantly switch position and leave garbage of themselves behind.

create a mutex object to synchronise on, and then in the function you want to be thread safe you create a local lock_guard using it. This mutex can be used in multiple places as well using the lock_guard.

share|improve this answer
    
I've changed the code in the fall() function; is it good now? –  Mutoh Nov 10 '12 at 20:32
    
@Mutoh is it working now? –  Caribou Nov 10 '12 at 20:35
    
Speaking the truth, no. But have I at least implemented it ideally? –  Mutoh Nov 10 '12 at 20:38
    
@Mutoh yes thats the way to use it. Let me review the code a little and see if there is something else I can see. –  Caribou Nov 11 '12 at 15:11
    
@Mutoh I think that render and unrender might be the points to synchronise on, the fall method is local to the boulder - if the mutex is different per instance of boulder then it won't protect the underlying functions that modify the x,y coords –  Caribou Nov 11 '12 at 15:18
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Here I created a very basic threading example without a framework or classes. As you can see, threading and syncronisation isn't C++ work, it's OS work! ;-)

Here I created a simple threadfunction, which I call two times. The threads writing the same variable, but can't do that the same time, so have to protect it. In this sample I use a CRITICAL_SECTION object to lock the variable by one thread. If the one thread lock it, the other can't access it and have to wait until it's free.

Have a closer look and see, I also protected the printf operations. What would happen if you don't do this? You will get a very funny outprint! Find out why and you know how threads and locks work. :-)

#include <windows.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <process.h>

//a global variable (just do do someting):
int g_ThreadCounter = 0;


//global variable to end the threads:
bool g_Run = true;
//do not use global variables, there are better solutions! I just did it here to 
//keep it simple and focus on the issue!

//a critical section object - something like a "soft-version" of a mutex to synchronize
//write access on variables
CRITICAL_SECTION critical;
//a thread function
unsigned  __stdcall threadFunc(void *pThreadNum)
{

    unsigned int iThreadNum = reinterpret_cast<unsigned int>(pThreadNum);

    do{
    //you need the critical section only when you change values:
    EnterCriticalSection(&critical);
        g_ThreadCounter++;

        printf("from thread: ");
        printf("%d", iThreadNum);
        printf(" counter = ");      
        printf("%d", g_ThreadCounter);
        printf("\n");
    LeaveCriticalSection(&critical);

    //sleep a secound
    Sleep (1000);
}while(g_Run);

_endthreadex(0);
return 0;
}

int main()
{
unsigned int ThreadID1 = 1;

unsigned int ThreadID2 = 2;
//initialize the critical section with spin count (can be very effective in case
//of short operation times, see msdn for more information)
if(!InitializeCriticalSectionAndSpinCount(&critical, 1000))
{
    //DO NOT START THE THREADS, YOU DON'T HAVE SYNCHRONISATION!!!
    printf("someting went wrong, press any key to exit");
    //do some error handling
    getchar();
    exit(-1);
}

//start the threads
HANDLE thHandle1 = (HANDLE)_beginthreadex(NULL, 0, &threadFunc, (void*) ThreadID1, 0, NULL);

HANDLE thHandle2 = (HANDLE)_beginthreadex(NULL, 0, &threadFunc, (void*) ThreadID2, 0, NULL);

if(thHandle1 == INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE || thHandle2 == INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
{
    printf("something went wrong, press any key to exit");
    //do some error handling
    getchar();
    exit(-1);
}
//the main thread sleeps while the other threads are working
Sleep(5000);

//set the stop variable
EnterCriticalSection(&critical);
    g_Run = false;
LeaveCriticalSection(&critical);

//wait for the thread; infinite means, you wait as long as the 
    //thread takes to finish
WaitForSingleObject(thHandle1, INFINITE);
CloseHandle(thHandle1);

WaitForSingleObject(thHandle2, INFINITE);
CloseHandle(thHandle2);

DeleteCriticalSection(&critical);

printf("press any key to exit");
getchar();

return 0;
}

Study the OS on which you are working! It's sometimes better than pay too much attention on Frameworks and foreign classes. This can solve a lot of questions!

share|improve this answer
    
Suppose there were something that throws an exception (that you didn't handle in a catch) between the Enter and Leave Critical section. Unless you use a technique like RAII (lock_guard) you will leave the section locked meaning that your app may not be able to recover without a restart. Frameworks use these OS functions underneath BTW... –  Caribou Nov 11 '12 at 15:09
    
Its's just a simple sample to show how locks work! Certainly you have to take care of deadlocks! Each try/chatch or return needs to release the critical section! –  marscode Nov 11 '12 at 17:26
1  
Yes but my point (and why C++ is useful) is that by using lock_guard you handle it even if you get an unexpected exception - I.E. one you didn't write code to handle :) –  Caribou Nov 11 '12 at 17:31
1  
And that's a really good thing and when I'm writing commercial code, I'm using framworks too, because they are saver. But you need to understand why things happens the way they do. This is a common problem when using framworks as a beginner! ;-) –  marscode Nov 11 '12 at 17:38
    
ok I conceed that point :P –  Caribou Nov 11 '12 at 17:39
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