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I don't want to persist any data but still want to use Neo4j for it's graph traversal and algorithm capabilities. In an embedded database, I've configured cache_type = strong and after all the writes I set the transaction to failure. But my write speeds (node, relationship creation speeds) are a slow and this is becoming a big bottleneck in my process.

So, the question is, can Neo4j be run without any persistence aspects to it at all and just as a pure API? I tried others like JGraphT but those don't have traversal mechanisms like the ones Neo4j provides.

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Did you find a feasible solution yet? –  JAGAMOT Dec 20 '12 at 17:09

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As far as I know, Neo4J data storage and Lucene indexes are always written to files. On Linux, at least, you could set up a ramfs filing system to hold the files in-memory.

See also:

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<quote> we are planning to do an in-memory implementation of Neo4j, but first after 1.0, simply no bandwidth right now :( </quote> I'm using 1.8 and don't see in memory support in the docs anywhere. –  chethan Nov 11 '12 at 6:22
    
Yep, I guess nobody found that bandwidth yet ;-) –  DNA Nov 11 '12 at 10:48
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Also, you could try ImpermanentGraphDatabase for testing? github.com/neo4j/community/blob/master/kernel/src/test/java/org/… –  Peter Neubauer Nov 11 '12 at 12:09

How many changes do you group in each transaction? You should try to group up to thousands of changes in each transaction since committing a transaction forces the logical log to disk.

However, in your case you could instead begin your transactions with:

db.tx().unforced().begin();

Instead of:

db.beginTx();

Which makes that transaction not wait for the logical log to force to disk and makes small transactions much faster, but a power outage could have you lose the last couple of seconds of data potentially.

The tx() method sits on GraphDatabaseAPI, which for example EmbeddedGraphDatabase implements.

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I switched over to the batch inserter now, slight improvement but not a lot. So no transactions to worry about. –  chethan Nov 11 '12 at 6:21

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