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I want to take a string that has letters and characters and filter out only the letters. I then want to reuse that string and put it into an array. How would I do that in C?
I have used isalpha() but only into printf, not into a variable. Thanks for any help.

#include <stdio.h> 
#include <string.h>  
#include <ctype.h>

int main(void)
{
    int i;
    string w = "name1234";
    string new ="";
    int length = strlen(w);

    for (i=0; length > i; i++)
    {
        if (isalpha(w[i]))
        {
            new = w;
        }
    }
    printf("This is the new one: %s\n", new);  //it should be 'name' not 'name1234'
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Kerrek SB, alk, lserni, Rimian, Andy Hayden Nov 11 '12 at 12:02

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
post your code. –  Caribou Nov 10 '12 at 20:32
    
Seems like HW too me? Would you like hints instead of an answer? –  mattclemens Nov 10 '12 at 20:33
    
If you know how to use printf for this, take a look at sprintf –  qrdl Nov 10 '12 at 20:33
1  
So is this C or C++? In C there isn't a specific string type. Also, what do your #include statements look like? –  Makoto Nov 10 '12 at 20:48
2  
@Martin The original question was bad, because it was incomplete. A downvote on that is okay (not compulsory, but justifiable). You have improved your question (well done), and now it's fine, good enough for five people (so far) to upvote. If you learn from it and post the relevant code right from the beginning next time, you'll skip the frustration of the initial downvotes. A belated welcome to Stack overflow, by the way. Be sure to read the faq to find out how the site rolls. –  Daniel Fischer Nov 10 '12 at 23:09

5 Answers 5

#include <stdio.h> 
#include <string.h>  
#include <ctype.h>

int main(void)
{
    int i, newx;
    char w[] = "name1234";

    int length = strlen(w);

    // in C99 or greater, you can do
    // char new[length+1];
    // to get a variable-length local array, instead of using malloc
    char* new = malloc(length+1);
    if (!new)
    {
         fprintf(stderr, "out of memory\n");
         return 1;
    }

    for (i = 0, newx = 0; length > i; i++)
    {
        if (isalpha((unsigned char)w[i]))
        {
            new[newx++] = w[i];
        }
    }
    new[newx] = '\0';

    printf("This is the new one: %s\n", new);  //it should be 'name' not 'name1234'
    free(new); // this isn't necessary since all memory is freed when the program exits
               // (and it isn't appropriate if new is a local array) 
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Don't forget to free the memory :) –  Maroun Maroun Nov 10 '12 at 21:03
    
+1 for error checking the result of malloc, but -1 for not free-ing the pointer at the end. –  Alex Reynolds Nov 10 '12 at 21:03
    
Also, strlen returns a size_t, not an int. –  Alex Reynolds Nov 10 '12 at 21:05
3  
A downvote for not freeing memory before exiting from main? That's absurd. Anyway, I added the free for the pedants who don't actually know the language. And the size_t is convertible to int and there's no reason not to use int if you know it's big enough to hold the size of the string. –  Jim Balter Nov 10 '12 at 21:08
1  
I vote + for the effort –  Alberto Bonsanto Nov 10 '12 at 21:22

Define the proper data type char * and not string. You want to filter string A and put the result in B, you have to:

1) Create char *a[size], char *b[size];
2) iterate over the "string" A and verify if the actual position (char) meets the requirements to go to the "string" B;
3) if it does, just do b[pos_b] = a[i]; and increment the variable pos_b.

You have to declare pos_b because you can be in a different position in array b that the position you are in array A. Since, you are just adding to array b letters.

share|improve this answer

This is the academic version:

const char* w= "name1234";
char* filteredString= (char*)malloc(sizeof(char));
const long length=strlen(w);
long size=0;
for(long i=0; i<length; i++)
{
    if(isalpha(w[i]))
    {
        size++;
        filteredString=(char*)realloc(filteredString, (size+1)*sizeof(char));
        filteredString[size-1]=w[i];
    }
}
filteredString[size]=0;
puts(filteredString);

Just to learn using realloc, but you could allocate the whole string on the stack and screw about memory usage, realloc takes CPU.

share|improve this answer

Here is a simple code. Make sure that you understand every line.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int main()
{
    char org[]="abc123defg";
    int size=sizeof(org)/sizeof(org[0]);   //size will hold the original array length 
    char* res=malloc((sizeof(char)*size)+1);  //+1 for the '\0' char that indicates end of a string
    if(!res)
        return 1; //allocation failed
    int i; int k=0;
    for(i=0;i<size;i++)
    {
        if(isalpha(org[i])) {
            res[k]=org[i];
            k++;
        }
    }
    res[k]='\0';
    printf("%s\n", res);  //now it will be abcdefg
    free(res);  //free the memory I've allocated for the result array
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
The sizeof function returns a size_t, not an int. Also, in C, sizeof(char) is always 1, so its inclusion is redundant. Finally, you did not free the pointer at the end of its lifespan. –  Alex Reynolds Nov 10 '12 at 21:08
2  
The implicit cast makes it a valid int, there is overflow only if the size_t value is too long, sizeof(org)/sizeof(org[0]) will never overflow. –  Ramy Al Zuhouri Nov 10 '12 at 21:10
1  
That's wrong too, sizeof(org) is 11*sizeof(char), because org is an array.He hasn't passed this array to a function, so the array will not decay in a pointer and it's size will still be 11*sizeof(char).The user is correct, I also have seen a lot of other downvotes (also on my question) for no reason. –  Ramy Al Zuhouri Nov 10 '12 at 21:43
1  
@RamyAlZuhouri You misunderstand me. In a real application, org would likely to be a char*, not an array. If the OP doesn't realize that the sizeof/sizeof only applies to arrays, not pointers, it will result in a bug ... one that we see here at SO every few days. –  Jim Balter Nov 10 '12 at 21:46
1  
@RamyAlZuhouri I mean an application that deals with strings of unknown length. I mean an application where the string is passed in as an argument, rather than being predefined in main as a test case, as here. As for static arrays, unless you're using VLA's, they impose an arbitrary length limit. –  Jim Balter Nov 10 '12 at 22:05

Well, I made some little modifications to your code to make it work properly, but you could use some libs like string.h. I hope you understand it:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <ctype.h>

int main(void)
{
    int i, j = 0;
    /* I limited your strings to avoid some problems. */
    char w[20]  = "name1234";
    /* The name "new" is a reserved word in C (at least in my IDE). */
    char nw[20] = "";
    int length  = strlen(w);
    for(i = 0; i < length; i++)
    {
        /* I added the special string end character '\0'. */
        if(isalpha(w[ i ]) || w[ i ] == '\0')
        {
            nw[ j ] = w[ i ];
            j++;
        }
    }
    printf("This is the new one: %s\n", nw);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The strlen function returns a size_t, not an int. –  Alex Reynolds Nov 10 '12 at 21:09
2  
@AlexReynolds you was the one who downvoted this answer because of the size_t ? if so, and only if, look around and you will see a bunch of people using int instead of size_t when using strlen(), even serious developers use int, IMHO is pointless, an string of more than 32^2-1 characters is very unlikely, a secure system should not let an user malloc(4GB) just like that. –  Kira Nov 10 '12 at 21:18
    
@Kira Indeed. Those downvotes are uncalled for and do not reflect programming competence. As I noted on my answer, calling for size_t for length but not for the indices i and j is wrong and incompetent, showing no understanding of type consistency. –  Jim Balter Nov 10 '12 at 21:28
    
@JimBalter If i do (int) strlen( ) is it considered correct? –  Alberto Bonsanto Nov 10 '12 at 21:29
1  
@AlbertoBonsanto It's already correct, as long as the string length doesn't exceed the capacity of an int. Adding the cast is unnecessary and casts can hide real errors. –  Jim Balter Nov 10 '12 at 21:31

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